Cover image for A fine dessert : four centuries, four families, one delicious treat
Title:
A fine dessert : four centuries, four families, one delicious treat
Author:
Jenkins, Emily, 1967-
Personal Author:
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Schwartz & Wade Books, [2015]

©2015
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 25 x 31 cm
Summary:
Depicts families, from England to California and from 1710 to 2010, preparing and enjoying the dessert called blackberry fool. Includes a recipe and historical notes.
General Note:
Statement of responsibility from jacket.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 770 Lexile.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780375868320

9780375968327
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

In 1710, a girl and her mother in Lyme, England, prepare a blackberry fool, picking wild blackberries and beating cream from their cow with a bundle of twigs. The same dessert is prepared by a slave girl and her mother in 1810 in Charleston, South Carolina; by a mother and daughter in 1910 in Boston; and finally by a boy and his father in present-day San Diego.

Kids and parents alike will delight in discovering the differences in daily life over the course of four centuries.


Author Notes

EMILY JENKINS has written many highly acclaimed books for children, including Water in the Park, a Booklist Editors' Choice and a Bulletin Blue Ribbon Book; Lemonade in Winter, a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year; and two Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor Books- Five Creatures and That New Animal . She is also the author of the popular Toys trilogy- Toys Go Out, Toy Dance Party, and Toys Come Home . Visit the author at emilyjenkins.com.

SOPHIE BLACKALL is the illustrator of The Mighty Lalouche by Matthew Olshan, a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year; Edwin Speaks Up by April Stevens, a Bank Street College of Education Best Book of the Year; and Ruby's Wish by Shirin Yim Bridges, an Ezra Jack Keats New Illustrator Award winner. She has also illustrated the Mr. and Mrs. Bunny series by Polly Horvath and the bestselling Ivy and Bean series by Annie Barrows. A native of Australia, she lives in Brooklyn, New York. Visit her at sophieblackall.com, where she has regularly posted about the process of making this book.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* A blackberry fool is a simple recipe that has been around for ages mashed blackberries are folded into whipped cream, then chilled. In this delightful and informative offering, Jenkins and Blackall show families in four centuries making the sweet treat. The book begins in 1710; a mother and daughter pick berries and whip cream using a whisk made of twigs. About 100 years later, a mother and daughter, slaves on a plantation, pick berries and whip cream, but they use a wire whisk, and they're only allowed to eat whatever's left over after serving the masters. Another 100 years later, a mother and daughter buy berries and use a whirring beater, and today, a father and son use an electric mixer to whip cream. The tools and families begin to look different over time, but the recipe is essentially the same, and so is the reaction when kids get a taste Mmmmm. Blackall's elaborate, antique-like watercolor illustrations are stuffed with historical tidbits, and she includes visual echoes that further link each time period. An author's note explains some of the history, which will be useful for little ones curious about the differences. And for kids wondering what all the fuss is about over blackberry fool, Jenkins provides a recipe. A delicious book about a delicious treat.--Hunter, Sarah Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this inventive culinary history, Jenkins (Water in the Park) traces a single dessert through the centuries as four families-from 1710, 1810, 1910, and 2010, respectively-puree blackberries and whip heavy cream to enjoy blackberry fool after dinner. "What a fine dessert!" each cook exclaims. Blackall's (The Baby Tree) scrupulously researched ink, watercolor, and blackberry juice (!) spreads document the dress, furnishings, and cooking methods of each family, and they repay close study and comparison; watching cream-whipping technology evolve is particularly enlightening. Unfortunately, an attempt at historical authenticity backfires as the 19th-century plantation family's blackberry fool is made for them by their slaves. The African-American cook and her daughter are not permitted to eat the dessert they've made; instead, they serve it to the white family, and the two are left to lick the bowl in a dark closet. The historical facts are not in dispute, but the disturbing injustices represented in this section of an otherwise upbeat account either require adult readers to present necessary background and context or-worse-to pass by them unquestioned. Ages 4-8. Illustrator's agent: Nancy Gallt, Nancy Gallt Literary Agency. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-More than mere confection, A Fine Dessert is a rich and satisfying journey across four centuries, told through the eyes of four families. Beginning with a young girl and her mother picking wild blackberries in Lyme, England in 1710 and ending with a father and son in modern day San Diego, each story is explored through the lens of making Blackberry Fool, a treat consisting of berries, cream, and sugar. Jenkins keeps the text tightly focused on the task at hand: gathering the ingredients, mixing them, presenting the finished dessert, and enjoying the sweet rewards. Each story follows the same pattern, allowing children to observe similarities and differences in across time periods. Technological progress is highlighted in the evolution of the mixing process: from a bundle of clean, soft twigs in the 18th century to a metal whisk made by a blacksmith in the 19th century to a cast-iron rotary beater in the 20th century and finally to the nearly effortless electric mixer in the 21st century. Blackall's ink and watercolor illustrations, accented with real blackberry juice, provide the details that both unify and differentiate the various historical periods. The story set on a Charleston plantation could have been uncomfortable in less capable hands. A spread shows a white family sitting down to supper as a slave family waits upon them. Jenkins and Blackall show rather than tell, allowing young readers to draw their own conclusions about the fact that the characters must hide in a closet to enjoy the dessert they've worked so hard to make. The final spread depicts a modern multigenerational, multicultural gathering. A recipe for Blackberry Fool is included. Simply delectable. -Kiera Parrott, School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.