Cover image for Faithful and virtuous night
Title:
Faithful and virtuous night
Author:
Glück, Louise, 1943-
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Poems. Selections
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Fararr, Straus and Giroux, 2014.
Physical Description:
71 pages ; 24 cm
Summary:
Louise Gluck is one of the finest American poets at work today. Her Poems 1962-2012 was hailed as "a major event in this country's literature" in the pages of The New York Times. Every new collection is at once a deepening and a revelation. Faithful and Virtuous Night is no exception. You enter the world of this spellbinding book through one of its many dreamlike portals, and each time you enter it's the same place but it has been arranged differently. You were a woman. You were a man. This is a story of adventure, an encounter with the unknown, a knight's undaunted journey into the kingdom of death; this is a story of the world you've always known, that first primer where "on page three a dog appeared, on page five a ball" and every familiar facet has been made to shimmer like the contours of a dream, "the dog float[ing] into the sky to join the ball." Faithful and Virtuous Night tells a single story but the parts are mutable, the great sweep of its narrative mysterious and fateful, heartbreaking and charged with wonder.
Language:
English
Contents:
Parable -- An Adventure -- The Past -- Faithful and Virtuous Night -- Theory of Memory -- A Sharply Worded Silence -- Visitors from Abroad -- Aboriginal Landscape -- Utopia -- Cornwall -- Afterword -- Midnight -- The Sword in the Stone -- Forbidden Music -- The Open Window -- The Melancholy Assistant -- A Foreshortened Journey -- Approach of the Horizon -- The White Series -- The Horse and Rider -- A Work of Fiction -- The Story of a Day -- A Summer Garden -- The Couple in the Park
ISBN:
9780374152017
Format :
Book

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Central Library PS3557 .L8 A6 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library PS3557 .L8 A6 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Crane Branch Library PS3557 .L8 A6 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Winner of the 2014 National Book Award for Poetry

A luminous, seductive new collection from the "fearless" ( The New York Times ) Pulitzer Prize-winning poet

Louise Glück is one of the finest American poets at work today. Her Poems 1962-2012 was hailed as "a major event in this country's literature" in the pages of The New York Times . Every new collection is at once a deepening and a revelation. Faithful and Virtuous Night is no exception.
You enter the world of this spellbinding book through one of its many dreamlike portals, and each time you enter it's the same place but it has been arranged differently. You were a woman. You were a man. This is a story of adventure, an encounter with the unknown, a knight's undaunted journey into the kingdom of death; this is a story of the world you've always known, that first primer where "on page three a dog appeared, on page five a ball" and every familiar facet has been made to shimmer like the contours of a dream, "the dog float[ing] into the sky to join the ball." Faithful and Virtuous Night tells a single story but the parts are mutable, the great sweep of its narrative mysterious and fateful, heartbreaking and charged with wonder.


Author Notes

Louise Elizabeth Gluck, 1943 - Louise Gluck was born April 22, 1943 in New York City, New York. She grew up on Long Island and attended Sarah Lawrence College and Columbia University, both in New York State. She is best known for her award winning collection entitled "The Wild Iris".

After graduation, Gluck began teaching poetry, accepting positions at various colleges and universities. In 1968, her first collection entitled "Firstborn" was published. Seven years later she published "The House on the Marshland", and in 1985, "The Triumph of Achilles" won the National Book Critics Circle Award for poetry. In 1993, she was an editor of The Best American Poetry anthology. Her last appointment was as Senior Lecturer in English at Williams College.

Louise Gluck is considered one of the most gifted poets of her generation. Known for her well-crafted use of verse and meter, she first garnered attention with "Firstborn", a collection of poetry from 1968. Full of angry emotion and disturbing tone, her poetry deals with the horrible and painful. In 1985, "The Triumph of Achilles" was released to thunderous applause, gaining awards in every category. It received the National Book Circle Award, the Boston Globe Literary Press Award and the Poetry Society of America's Melville Kane Award. Gluck has received the Bollingen Prize in Poetry, the Lannas Literary Award for Poetry, fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations and the National Endowments for the Arts. Her collection "Ararat", (1990) received the Rebekah Johnson Bobbett National Prize for Poetry. Other collections include "The Garden" and "The Wild Iris". The "Wild Iris", perhaps her most award winning collection acquired the highest honor possible in 1993, the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. It also received the Poetry Society of America's William Carlos Williams Award

In 1994 she was named Poet Laureate of Vermont, and was elected as a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. In 2003, she was named Poet Laureat of the United States.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Glück begins her new collection, following the magnificent retrospective, Poems 1962-2012, with Parable, a keenly droll look at a metaphysical quandary central to the human condition, which sets the scope for the entire exquisitely musing volume. In the title poem, a transfixing symphony of night and its disconcerting illuminations, the speaker thinks, Perhaps the occupation of a very young child / is to observe and listen. This is also the work of a poet, which Glück performs in the persona of an orphaned boy who becomes an artist enthralled by the cycles of life, skeptical about our sense of purpose, and warily attentive to death. Glück, as masterful formally as she is descriptively, navigates gracefully through the dark, without and within, via a poetic form of echolocation, bursting out now and then into summer's bright carnival and the white blaze of snow. Witty, philosophical, and sensuous, Glück embraces dichotomies The whole exchange seemed both deeply fraudulent / and profoundly true while gracefully posing provocative questions about the nexus between nature and art and the churning complexity of consciousness.--Seaman, Donna Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Gluck's 12th collection, her first since Poems 1962-2012, is one where myth, long a primary concern of hers, takes a backseat to more quotidian affairs. "Mist covered the stage (my life)./ Characters came and went, costumes were changed,/ my brush hand moved side to side/ far from the canvas,/ side to side," Gluck writes, "I took a deep breath. And it came to me/ the person who drew that breath/ was not the person in my story." While readers familiar with Gluck will recognize her voice, here she is more conversational, more grounded in the materiality of human experience: "First divesting ourselves of worldly goods," the book begins, "we had then to discuss/ whither or where we might travel, with the second question being/ should we have a purpose." Whether through long poems or short prose bursts, she returns to stillness and night as the baselines for human experience, stages upon which the human drama unfolds. "I was aware of movement around me, my fellow beings/ driven by a mindless fetish for action-// How deeply I resisted this!" Gluck notes, "truth as I saw it/ was expressed as stillness." Characteristically sure-footed, Gluck speaks to our time in a voice that is onstage, but heard from the wings. Agent: Wylie Agency. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Old poets never die. They just write about "entering the kingdom of death," as Gluck, former winner of the Bollingen Prize for Poetry, calls it. In the poet's latest collection, aging is a cerebral place where the poet remembers her childhood years and connects them to the present. The title poem is memoirlike, describing halcyon (and not so halcyon) days with an older brother and later with a younger sibling. Other pieces suggest that for the poet, adventures are in the past, including her experiences as a writer. The best poems here allude to the state of the soul-"How deep it goes, this soul,/ like a child in a department store,/ seeking its mother." Gluck's imagery is muted but remains strong. Her voice still has its incantatory rhythms and hypnotic effects, but gone is the vivid metaphor and bright crisp style of the poems (with their sense of overhearing the pronouncements of a Greek chorus) found in the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Wild Iris. VERDICT These language poems try to travel to the interior-both the poet's and the reader's-but meander and often seem to go nowhere slowly although with a certain gracefulness.-C. Diane Scharper, Towson Univ., MD (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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