Cover image for Lighter as we go : virtues, character strengths, and aging
Title:
Lighter as we go : virtues, character strengths, and aging
Author:
Greenstein, Mindy.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2015.
Physical Description:
xix, 285 pages : illustrations ; 19 cm
Summary:
"The fears of aging have been one long cascading domino effect through the years: twenty year-olds dread thirty; forty year-olds fear fifty; sixty fears seventy, and so it goes. And there is something to worry about, though it isn't what you'd expect: research shows that having a bad attitude toward aging when we're young is associated with poorer health when we're older. These worries tend to peak in midlife; but in Lighter as We Go, Mindy Greenstein and Jimmie Holland show us that, contrary to common wisdom, our sense of well-being actually increases with our age--often even in the presence of illness or disability. For the first time, Greenstein and Holland--on a joint venture between an 85 year-old and a fifty year-old--explore positive psychology concepts of character strengths and virtues to unveil how and why, through the course of a lifetime, we learn who we are as we go. Drawing from the authors' own personal, intergenerational friendship, as well as a broad array of research from many different areas--including social psychology, anthropology, neuroscience, humanities, psychiatry, and gerontology--Lighter as We Go introduces compassion, justice, community, and culture to help calm our cascading fears of aging"--

"Contrary to common wisdom and the fears of mid-lifers, our sense of well-being actually goes up in older age, even in the presence of illness or disability. Lighter as We Go is the first book to explore how and why that is, drawing on positive psychology concepts of character strengths and virtues"--
Language:
English
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: -- Introduction -- Part I: Character, Character Strength, and Continuity Over Time -- Chapter 1. The Oak Tree and the U-Bend: Age, Well-Being, and the Experience of Me-ness -- Chapter 2. A Look at the Grownup Years -- Chapter 3. Character Strengths and Virtues -- Chapter 4. Older Age in the Olden Days: A History of Aging in the Western World -- Part II: The Virtues -- Chapter 5. The Virtue of Transcendence: Beyond the Self -- Chapter 6. The Underappreciated Virtue of Humor: You Can't Spell Joy Without the Oy -- Chapter 7. The Virtues of Humanity and Social Justice: Do Unto Others -- Chapter 8. The Virtue of Courage: If I Only Had the Nerve -- Chapter 9. The Virtue of Wisdom: Knowing What We Don't Know -- Chapter 10. The Virtue of Temperance: Moderation in All Things (almost) -- Chapter 11. The Virtue of Passing on to the Next Generation: The Bridge Between Past and Future -- Part III Putting the Virtues to Work -- Chapter 12. When Older Doesn't Feel Lighter: Loneliness and Social Isolation -- Chapter 13. The Virtue of Appreciating the Cycle of Life in Elders -- Appendix: Vintage Readers Book Club Readings.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780199360956
Format :
Book

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Central Library HQ1061 .G717 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library HQ1061 .G717 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library HQ1061 .G717 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Kenmore Library HQ1061 .G717 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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City of Tonawanda Library HQ1061 .G717 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

The fears of aging have been one long cascading domino effect through the years: twenty year-olds dread thirty; forty year-olds fear fifty; sixty fears seventy, and so it goes. And there is something to worry about, though it isn't what you'd expect: research shows that having a bad attitudetoward aging when we're young is associated with poorer health when we're older. These worries tend to peak in midlife; but in Lighter as We Go, Mindy Greenstein and Jimmie Holland show us that, contrary to common wisdom, our sense of well-being actually increases with our age - often even in the presence of illness or disability. For the first time, Greenstein and Holland - ona joint venture between an 85 year-old and a fifty year-old - explore positive psychology concepts of character strengths and virtues to unveil how and why, through the course of a lifetime, we learn who we are as we go. Drawing from the authors' own personal, intergenerational friendship, as wellas a broad array of research from many different areas - including social psychology, anthropology, neuroscience, humanities, psychiatry, and gerontology - Lighter as We Go introduces compassion, justice, community, and culture to help calm our cascading fears of aging.


Author Notes

Jimmie Holland was born Jimmie Coker in Forney, Texas on April 9, 1928. She received a bachelor's degree from Baylor University and a medical degree Baylor College of Medicine. She taught psychiatry at the State University of New York at Buffalo from 1956 to 1973 and practiced at Edward J. Meyer Memorial Hospital in Buffalo from 1958 to 1972. After serving as a consultant on a joint Soviet-American schizophrenia research study in Moscow in 1972, she taught and practiced at Montefiore Hospital of Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. She joined Memorial Sloan Kettering in 1977.

She was a pioneer the field of psycho-oncology, which is treating the emotional distress of cancer patients while their medical symptoms are addressed. She helped establish a division of psychiatry at Sloan Kettering. She was chief of the psychiatry service until 1996 and chairwoman of the department of psychiatry until 2003. She also taught at Weill Cornell medical school. Her book, The Human Side of Cancer written with Sheldon Lewis, was published in 2000. She died from complications of cardiovascular disease on December 24, 2017 at the age of 89.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Choice Review

This book presents a well thought out historical view of growing old in today's world. Greenstein and Holland (both, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center) do a wonderful job of placing aging in historical context. The book is intended to help readers consider aging not in terms of old age per se but as a process of growing lighter, of becoming "lighter as we go." The authors situate aging in positive aspects of character, strength, and continuity, all virtues that allow one to absorb and accept the inevitable changes in life as natural. The authors draw on real stories and events readers can relate to in order to help develop images of themselves as they age. A major contribution to the field of aging and adult studies, this study provides a new way to view, consider, and teach aging. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readers. --Andre L Lewis, University of Arkansas Monticello


Table of Contents

Introduction
Part I Character, Character Strength, and Continuity Over Time
1 The Oak Tree and the U-Bend: Age, Well-Being, and the Experience of Me-ness
2 A Look at the Grownup Years
3 Character Strengths and Virtues
4 Older Age in the Olden Days: A History of Aging in the Western World
Part II The Virtues
5 The Virtue of Transcendence: Beyond the Self
6 The Underappreciated Virtue of Humor: You Can't Spell Joy Without the Oy
7 The Virtues of Humanity and Social Justice: Do Unto Others
8 The Virtue of Courage: If I Only Had the Nerve
9 The Virtue of Wisdom: Knowing What We Don't Know
10 The Virtue of Temperance: Moderation in All Things (almost)
11 The Virtue of Passing on to the Next Generation: The Bridge Between Past and Future
Part III Putting the Virtues to Work
12 When Older Doesn't Feel Lighter: Loneliness and Social Isolation
13 The Virtue of Appreciating the Cycle of Life in Elders
Appendix: Vintage Readers Book Club Readings

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