Cover image for Driven to distraction at work : how to focus and be more productive
Title:
Driven to distraction at work : how to focus and be more productive
Author:
Hallowell, Edward M., author.
Publication Information:
Boston, Massachusetts : Harvard Business Review Press, [2015]
Physical Description:
viii, 247 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Summary:
"Hallowell, known for his work with children and adults, now identifies the underlying reasons why people really lose their ability to focus at work--where many of today's adults feel distracted and unproductive. He explains why commonly offered solutions like 'learn to manage your time better' or 'make a to-do list' just don't work because they don't address the deeper, underlying issues of mental distraction"--
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction: Attention deficit train: the growing workplace problem -- The six most common distractions at work-- and how to overcome them. Screen sucking: how to control your electronics so they don't control you ; Multitasking: how to say no when you have more to do than time to do it ; Idea hopping: how to finish what you start ; Worrying: how to turn toxic worry into problem solving ; Playing the hero: how to stop fixing everyone's problems-- expect your own ; Dropping the ball: how to stop underachieving at work -- Training your attention: how to manage and maintain your ability to focus. Flexible focus: creating the optimal state for excellence ; Harnessing the power of the body ; Harnessing the power of the mind ; Harnessing the power of the human connection ; Harnessing the power of emotion ; Harnessing the power of structure ; Distracted no more -- Appendix. A word about ADHD and medications.
ISBN:
9781422186411
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library BF323.D5 H35 2015 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Are you driven to distraction at work?

Bestselling author Edward M. Hallowell, MD, the world's leading expert on ADD and ADHD, has set his sights on a new goal: helping people feel more in control and productive at work.

You know the feeling: you can't focus; you feel increasingly overwhelmed by a mix of nonstop demands and technology that seems to be moving at the speed of light; and you're frustrated just trying to get everything done well--and on time. Not only is this taking a toll on performance, it's impacting your sense of well-being outside the office. It's time to reclaim control.

Dr. Hallowell now identifies the underlying reasons why people lose their ability to focus at work. He explains why commonly offered solutions like "learn to manage your time better" or "make a to-do list" don't work because they ignore the deeper issues that are the true causes of mental distraction. Based on his years of helping clients develop constructive ways to deal with distraction, Dr. Hallowell provides a set of practical and reliable techniques to show how to sustain a productive mental state.

In Part 1 of the book, he identifies the six most common ways people lose the ability to focus at work--what he calls "screen sucking" (internet/social media addiction), multitasking, idea hopping (never finishing what you start), worrying, playing the hero, and dropping the ball--and he explains the underlying psychological and emotional dynamics driving each behavior.

Part 2 of the book provides advice for "training" your attention overall, so that you are less susceptible to surrendering it, in any situation. The result is a book that will empower you to combat each one of these common syndromes--and clear a path for you to achieve your highest personal and professional goals.


Author Notes

Edward M. Hallowell, a child and adult psychiatrist as well as an author and lecturer, is a graduate of Harvard College, Tulane Medical School, and a Harvard Residency Program in Adult and Child Psychiatry. In addition to his private psychiatry practice in Cambridge, Mass., and his teaching career at Harvard Medical School, Hallowell is the founder and director of The Hallowell Center for Cognitive and Emotional Health. The Center specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of cognitive and emotional problems in both children and adults.

As an author, Hallowell has written two best-selling books on Attention Deficit Disorder: Driven to Distraction and Answers to Distraction. He has also written the comprehensive books When You Worry About The Child You Love and Worry: Controlling It and Using It Wisely.

Hallowell, who is married and has three children, lives in Massachusetts

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

The current workplace expectation of doing more with fewer resources is putting additional pressures on workers, leading to longer hours, multitasking, and inability to effectively focus on tasks. Readers who feel that the distractions of work and life are causing them to be less productive at work may be interested to learn how to improve focus, from a specialist who has been advising people on that topic for years. Hallowell is an authority on attention deficit disorder (ADD) and he makes the distinction between ADD and ADT, the attention deficit trait he says can develop from stresses in the workplace. He shares proven strategies for managing six of the most common distractions at work, including screen addiction, multitasking, and heroism. The writing is conversational and engaging, and inspires readers to create individual plans based on the five elements of energy, emotion, engagement, structure, and control. Each chapter includes 10 practical tips for overcoming distractions, like improving concentration through flexible focus. It's a practical and encouraging guide to developing the mental clarity to achieve one's goals through enhanced focus.--Kryszak, Cindy Copyright 2014 Booklist


Library Journal Review

Not enough time, overwhelmed, too many distractions-sound familiar? If you can make the time to read it, this new work may have some techniques to assuage the chaos. Hallowell, a psychiatrist who has previously written similar books focused on those living with ADD and ADHD (e.g., coauthor, Delivered from Distraction), has now turned his attention to the broader world of the workplace. In a conversational style, using composite characters and scenarios as examples, he examines six common issues, including electronic distractions, problems with multitasking, anxiety, "idea hopping," underachieving, and being a "hero." Once these are laid out, the author provides practical ways to address them. His suggestions, while not exactly new (exercise, meditation, structuring your workday, connecting with those around you, thinking more positively, etc.), seem doable, unlike so many in similar offerings. VERDICT A useful book, focusing on issues most of us face daily. Recommended for public libraries and those with significant self-help or business/career collections.-Susan Hurst, Miami Univ. Libs., Oxford, OH (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Introduction: attention deficit trait the growing workplace problem
Part 1 the six most common distractions at work-and how to overcome them
1 screen sucking: how to control your electronics so they don't control youp. 19
2 multitasking how to say no when you have more to do than time to do itp. 39
3 idea hopping: how to finish what you startp. 57
4 worrying how to turn toxic worry into problem solvingp. 79
5 playing the hero: how to stop fixing everyone's problems-except your ownp. 97
6 dropping the ball how to stop underachieving at workp. 119
Part 2 training your attention how to manage and maintain your ability to focus
7 flexible focus creating the optimal state for excellencep. 135
8 harnessing the power of the bodyp. 155
9 harnessing the power of the mindp. 171
10 harnessing the power of the human connectionp. 179
11 harnessing the power of emotionp. 189
12 harnessing the power of structurep. 205
13 distracted no morep. 217
Appendix a word about ADHD and medicationsp. 227
notesp. 233
indexp. 239
acknowledgmentsp. 249
about the authorp. 251

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