Cover image for Over the Wall
Title:
Over the Wall
Author:
Wartman, Peter.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Minneapolis, MN : Uncivilized Books 2013.
Physical Description:
100 pages : chiefly illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
A great wall separates a magnificent metropolis from the surrounding countryside. All humans are banned from ever entering the city. A young girl is determined to enter the forbidden city in search of her lost brother. When she crosses over, fantastic adventures ensue in narrow medieval streets, ancient temples, and abandoned bazaars of the haunted city. To save her missing brother, she must grapple with mythical creatures, explore the mystery of the missing inhabitants, and cure the amnesia of an entire civilization.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780984681433
Format :
Book

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Material Type
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Status
Central Library FICTION Graphic Novel Central Library
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Summary

Summary

"One of 10 Best Comics and Graphic Novels of the year."--The Onion
"Great Graphic Novel for Teens"--Young Adult Library Services Association
A great wall separates a magnificent metropolis from the surrounding countryside. All humans are banned from ever entering the city. A young girl is determined to enter the forbidden city in search of her lost brother. When she crosses over, fantastic adventures ensue in narrow medieval streets, ancient temples, and abandoned bazars of the haunted city. To save her missing brother, she must grapple with mythical creatures, explore the mystery of the missing inhabitants, and cure the amnesiaof an entire civilization. Over the Wall immerses the reader in a richly imagined world of coming of age rituals, lost worlds and the nature of memory. The beautiful two-color art vividly brings to life the fantastical architecture of mysterious metropolis and faintly evokes the crisp lines of Japanese anime. Over the Wall is a stunning debut from a young and talented cartoonist Peter Wartman.
Peter Wartman is a designer by day and a cartoonist by night. He lives and works in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Over the Wall is his first graphic novel.


Author Notes

Peter Wartman is a cartoonists and designer. He lives and works in Minneapolis, MN.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Mom and Dad, I know I have a brother, even if I can't remember his name. With those words, a young girl sets off from her simple village, determined to rescue the brother who was lost in a demon-infested, ruined city before his very existence is forgotten by her and the rest of the villagers. Wartman's fantasy graphic novel is a stand-alone title that doesn't answer all of the questions readers may have about the world he builds, but it is nonetheless satisfying, with strong, confident art and a determined protagonist. Though he works with a limited character count and color palette and keeps the story clearly focused on the seemingly simple rescue mission, Wartman allows himself one bit of extravagance: the amount of detail in his images. The characters are cartoonish enough to be friendly or creepy as needed and are supported by a fully fleshed-out setting, which firmly brings the reader into the tale. Middle-school readers will love this strong young woman and her dramatic fantasy-adventure.--Wildsmith, Snow Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Wartman's debut graphic novel combines archetypal simplicity in its story line with complex questions of personal identity and heroism. The unnamed young heroine finds herself with the sole remaining memory of her brother, who disappeared during his participation in an initiation rite staged at a mysterious abandoned city at the center of her culture's heritage. Unwilling to forget him, she becomes determined to rescue him from oblivion in the demon-infested city, whatever the personal cost or unlikely alliances it may demand. Her venture into the abandoned, taboo city to find him takes on aspects of a hero's journey from multicultural mythology, presented by Wartman in lavish inks and detailed haunting, labyrinthine architecture. Wartman's use of silent panels, distance, and scale suggest the overwhelming revelations facing his youthful challenger, and his visual focus on the role of storytelling is often ingeniously presented through stone inscriptions and statuary that expand upon the story. Although the story resonates with mythic allusions, Wartman's art is closer to an animated style, with cartoony characters and sometimes exaggerated emotions. This makes the story a highly approachable adventure tale that explores the nature of quests and the motivations behind them. (Reviewed from a b&w galley.) (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


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