Cover image for Ballerina dreams
Title:
Ballerina dreams
Author:
Thompson, Lauren.
Personal Author:
Edition:
1st ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Feiwel & Friends, 2007.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
A true story of love, hope, and courage follows five little girls from Bayside, Queens, who wanted to be ballerinas and did not let physical disabilities, or crutches, or wheelchairs, or walkers, get in the way of their dreams.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 860 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 5.1 0.5 118649.

Reading Counts RC K-2 5.6 2 Quiz: 43378.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780312370299
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library RJ496.C4 T46 2007 Juvenile Non-Fiction Childrens Area
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library RJ496.C4 T46 2007 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Once upon a time there were five little girls who shared a dream. They wanted to be ballerinas and dance on stage like their sisters and cousins and friends.

But it would be hard for these girls to make their dream come true. They had cerebral palsy or other physical disabilities, which meant their muscles didn't move the way they wanted them to. Some wore leg braces. Some used wheelchairs and walkers to get around. But these girls were determined. They had a dedicated teacher. Every week they practiced. They worked hard. And one day they were ready.

Ballerina Dreams is an inspiring true story of love, hope and courage for everyone and anyone who has ever wished (and worked) hard enough to make their dreams come true.

Ballerina Dreams is the winner of the 2008 Bank Street - Flora Stieglitz Award.


Author Notes

Lauren Thompson loved ballet class when she was a child, although she never got the chance to participate in a ballet recital. In creating Ballerina Dreams , she drew inspiration from her own memories as well as from conversations with the girls, their parents, and their teacher, Joann Ferrara. Ms. Thompson worked as a children's book editor for eighteen years before becoming a full-time writer. Her many picture books include Polar Bear Night , which was a New York Times bestseller, and the Mouse's First and Little Quack series, and most recently, The Apple Pie That Papa Baked . She lives in Brooklyn, New York with her husband and son.

James Estrin is a senior staff photographer for the New York Times and was part of a New York Times Pulitzer prize-winning team. His work has appeared in dozens of books, including A Nation Challenged , Portraits of Grief , The Century in Times Square , and Jews in America , and in thousands of newspapers and magazines throughout the world. He lives in Scarsdale, New York, with his wife, the writer Randy Banner, and their two children, Elizabeth and Marshall.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

For children with muscular disorders like cerebral palsy, fulfilling a desire to dance isn't as easy as signing up at the local ballet studio. For five such children, a class run by a physical therapist and an exciting, end-of-year recital offer a place to shine. In focusing on more than just one child, and often referring to the dancers as a group ( they feel like real ballerinas at last ), this unusual photo-essay sometimes risks reducing its subjects to triumph-over-adversity symbols. But concluding profiles help to individualize each girl, and throughout, the images of openly thrilled performers, all supported from behind by teen helpers, are affecting in the extreme. With adult guidance, this will support character-education units about perseverance, and young dancers drawn by the pink jacket (which doesn't hint at the girls' physical challenges) will emerge with a new empathy for those whose outward differences tend to set them apart. A welcome, straightforward endnote about CP concludes this memorable book, whose sales will help support the program it spotlights.--Mattson, Jennifer Copyright 2007 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Inspired by a 2006 New York Times article, this poignant photo-essay taps Thompson's (Polar Bear Night) storytelling talent and Times photographer Estrin's behind-camera skill to chronicle a ballet recital given by five unlikely young dancers. The performers, ranging in age from three to seven, all have various disorders such as cerebral palsy; for them, raising their arms, holding themselves upright and maintaining their balance can be feats requiring very hard work. Thompson frames their story as one of a dream come true (the performance incorporated "When you wish upon a star..." to make the same point), and in describing the girls' work with their teacher, New York City physical therapist Joann Ferrara, the author stresses what these girls might have in common with the audience-their excitement, their delight in their tutus and tiaras, their last-minute jitters, their unmistakable pleasure in dancing. With similar effect, close-up portraits introduce the five girls, all shown beaming, before readers see full-body shots revealing their leg braces and the teen helpers who support the dancers onstage. An especially attractive design breaks each spreads into blocks of text, solid pink panels, and group and individual photos. The insightful presentation encourages readers not only to identify with the dancers, but to draw inspiration from them as well. A portion of the proceeds will benefit Ferrara's Dancing Dreams program. Ages 5-8. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Five adorable little girls are given the opportunity to learn to dance like ballerinas and eventually perform on stage. This is no small accomplishment since the girls have cerebral palsy and other muscle disorders and several wear leg braces. To inspire them, their teacher, who is a dancer and physical therapist, gives each of them a glittery tiara and a wand. Assistance is provided to them, as needed, by helpers between the ages of 11 and 16 who work with them during each class and at the recital. As the children learn the steps, their confidence improves and their muscles grow stronger. Finally on the day of the recital, the excitement of makeup and lovely costumes combines with the magic of performing to the beautiful music from The Nutcracker and Swan Lake as they realize their dreams. This is an inspiring portrayal of determination and love that will foster empathy among young readers. The colorful photographs of this dancing community working toward a common goal accurately and sensitively capture the struggles and joyful enthusiasm of all of the participants.-Carol Schene, formerly at Taunton Public Schools, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Once upon a time there were five little girls who shared a dream. They wanted to be ballerinas and dance on stage like their sisters and cousins and friends. But it would be hard for these girls to make their dream come true. They had cerebral palsy or other physical disabilities, which meant their muscles didn't move the way they wanted them to. Some wore leg braces. Some used wheelchairs and walkers to get around. But these girls were determined. They had a dedicated teacher. Every week they practiced. They worked hard. And one day they were ready. Ballerina Dreams is an inspiring true story of love, hope and courage for everyone and anyone who has ever wished (and worked) hard enough to make their dreams come true. Lauren Thompson loved ballet class when she was a child, although she never got the chance to participate in a ballet recital. In creating Ballerina Dreams , she drew inspiration from her own memories as well as from conversations with the girls, their parents, and their teacher, Joann Ferrara. Ms. Thompson worked as a children's book editor for eighteen years before becoming a full-time writer. Her many picture books include Polar Bear Night , which was a New York Times bestseller, and the Mouse's First and Little Quack series, and most recently, The Apple Pie That Papa Baked . She lives in Brooklyn, New York with her husband and son. James Estrin is a senior staff photographer for the New York Times and was part of a New York Times Pulitzer prize-winning team. His work has appeared in dozens of books, including A Nation Challenged , Portraits of Grief , The Century in Times Square , and Jews in America , and in thousands of newspapers and magazines throughout the world. He lives in Scarsdale, New York, with his wife, the writer Randy Banner, and their two children, Elizabeth and Marshall. Excerpted from Ballerina Dreams: A True Story by Lauren Thompson All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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