Cover image for Finding Ruby Starling
Title:
Finding Ruby Starling
Author:
Rivers, Karen, 1970- , author.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Arthur A. Levine Books, an imprint of Scholastic Inc., 2014.
Physical Description:
294 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
Through e-mails, letters, blog entries, and movie scripts, twelve-year-old Ruth, an American girl, and Ruby, an English one, discover that they are long-lost twins.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780545534796
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

When Ruth Quayle used a special app to search for pictures of herself online, she found dozens of images of "Ruth Quayle" -- and one of "Ruby Starling."



When Ruby Starling gets a message from a Ruth Quayle proclaiming them to be long-lost twin sisters, she doesn't know what to do with it -- until another message arrives the day after, and another one. It could be a crazy stalker ... but she and this Ruth do share a birthday, and a very distinctive ear....



Ruth is an extroverted American girl. Ruby is a shy English one. As they investigate the truth of their birth and the circumstances of their separation, they also share lives full of friends, family, and possible romances -- and they realize they each may be the sister the other never knew she needed.



Written entirely in e-mails, letters, Tumblr entries, and movie scripts, Finding Ruby Starling is the funny and poignant companion to Karen Rivers's The Encyclopedia of Me .


Author Notes

Karen Rivers writes rich and funny novels for middle-grade readers, young adults, and the occasional grown-up. She lives in Victoria, British Columbia, with her two children and a noxious-smelling dog. Visit her online at http://www.karenrivers.com and @karenrivers.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Using an Internet image search, New Yorker Ruth Quayle finds pictures of Ruby, a girl in London who looks just like her. She immediately e-mails Ruby and then obsesses with her best friend on why Ruby does not reply immediately. Ruby, in the meantime, is talking it over with her friends, wondering if Ruth is a stalker. Told through e-mails, letters, and poems, the girls slowly unravel the mystery. The adults who may be able to help are generally unavailable, which allows the girls plenty of time to e-mail each other. Ruth struggles with anger toward her birth mother and works toward understanding and embracing the Buddhist philosophy of being the river. The story moves slowly with many side conversations, though the idea of an unknown identical twin remains appealing. Though not as intricate as Feeling Sorry for Celia, by Jaclyn Moriarty (St. Martin's, 2002), or as light and funny as Jennifer L. Holm's Middle School Is Worse Than Meatloaf (Atheneum, 2007), this should nonetheless find an audience with girls looking for epistolary novels.--Harold, Suzanne Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Rivers's (The Encyclopedia of Me) epistolary novel conveys both the unique intimacy created by writing letters (or, in this case, emails) and the thrill of discovering an unknown family member. When 12-year-old adopted New Yorker Ruth Quayle plugs a photo of herself into a search engine, she's shocked to find images of what appears to be an identical twin living in England. She sends an enthusiastic missive to the girl, Ruby Starling, who is initially skeptical but soon becomes convinced that Ruth is her sister. Both girls get migraines and find small spaces comforting, but otherwise their lives are very different. Ruth writes poems and is working on an animated documentary with her best friend; Ruby is into fashion, crushing on a pop star, and prone to panic attacks since her grandmother died. The two make plans to meet, but are nervous to discover why they were separated. Amid a flood of escalating emotions, the emails exchanged among the girls and their friends and parents blend to create a lively chorus of voices. Ages 10-14. (Aug.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-After doing an image search on herself, Ruth Quayle finds pictures of a girl who looks like her double. Ruby Starling is also 12 _, but unlike Ruth, living in America with adoptive parents, she lives in England with her birth mother. The novel is told in a series of emails between the girls and to and from their friends and families.The emails are full of slang that works for both girls' cultures and feels surprisingly authentic. Interspersed with the emails are Ruth's poems, posted to her Tumblr page, and Ruby's handwritten letters to her dead Gran. Readers travel through the emotional journey of discovering an unknown twin while trying to navigate the normal tween life of best friends and maybe boyfriends. Both girls have trouble understanding why their mother kept Ruby and gave up Ruth but in the end find that reconciliation is possible. The emotional content of the novel comes through in a genuine and natural way; readers will feel for each girl as they discover each other and the truths about themselves. The other characters are only lightly sketched, but their relationships to the twins add depth to the readers' understanding of the girls. Overall, a fun book for middle graders.-Genevieve Feldman, San Francisco Public Library (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.