Cover image for A dragon's guide to the care and feeding of humans
Title:
A dragon's guide to the care and feeding of humans
Author:
Yep, Laurence, 1948- , author.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Crown Books for Young Readers, [2015]
Physical Description:
152 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Summary:
Crusty dragon Miss Drake's new pet human, precocious ten-year-old Winnie, not only thinks Miss Drake is her pet, she accidentally brings to life her "sketchlings" of mysterious and fantastic creatures hidden in San Francisco, causing mayhem among its residents.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
840 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.6 5.0 173685.
ISBN:
9780385392280

9780385392297
Format :
Book

Available:*

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On Order

Summary

Summary

Fans of How to Train Your Dragon will love this whimsical tale, the first in a series, by a Newbery Honor winner, featuring charming illustrations and pet "training tips" in each chapter.

Crusty dragon Miss Drake has a new pet human, precocious Winnie. Oddly enough, Winnie seems to think Miss Drake is her pet--a ridiculous notion!

Unknown to most of its inhabitants, the City by the Bay is home to many mysterious and fantastic creatures, hidden beneath the parks, among the clouds, and even in plain sight. And Winnie wants to draw every new creature she encounters: the good, the bad, and the ugly. But Winnie's sketchbook is not what it seems. Somehow, her sketchlings have been set loose on the city streets! It will take Winnie and Miss Drake's combined efforts to put an end to the mayhem . . . before it's too late.

This refreshing debut collaboration by Laurence Yep, a two-time Newbery Honor winner and a Laura Ingalls Wilder Award winner, and Joanne Ryder features illustrations by Mary GrandPré.     

Praise for A Dragon's Guide to the Care and Feeding of Humans
*"Warm humor, magical mishaps, and the main characters' budding mutual respect and affection combine to give this opener for a planned series a special shine." - Booklist , Starred

"Aternately comical, suspenseful and sometimes sweetly emotional." - Kirkus Reviews

"With a black-and-white spot illustration opening most chapters, an engaging narrator, and a consistently fluid writing style, this title makes a fine dragon choice for readers." - School Library Journal

"In this series launch, Yep and Ryder conjure up a world where dragons and humans interact, and the results are heartwarming and quite funny." - Publishers Weekly

"A clever and amusing novel that imagines a magical world that nestles right up against our own and sometimes crosses over." - The Bulleting of the Center for Children's Books

Praise for A Dragon's Guide to Making Your Human Smarter
"Yep and Ryder keep the magic coming with their whimsical fantasy, enhanced by Grandpré's sweet drawings. The story positively vibrates with fun." -- Kirkus Reviews

" Lighthearted episodes of unusual school lessons and field trips, illustrated by GrandPré's winsome spot art, are grounded by Miss Drake's more serious encounters with the goons...a gratifying development as this buoyant, fantastical series continues."-- The Horn Book Review


Author Notes

Laurence Yep was born in San Francisco, California on June 14, 1948. He graduated from the University of California at Santa Cruz in 1970 and received a Ph.D. in English from the State University of New York at Buffalo.

He primarily writes fiction for young adults, but has also written and edited several works for adults. His first novel, Sweetwater, was published in 1973. His other books include Dragonwings, Dragon's Gate, Shadow Lord, Child of the Owl, The Earth Dragon Awakes: The San Francisco Earthquake of 1906, and The Dragon's Child: A Story of Angel Island. He has won numerous awards for his work including the Newbery Medal Honor Book, the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, Jane Addams Children's Book Award, and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* In droll counterpoint to the How to Train Your Dragon franchise, Yep and Ryder offer a similar interspecies matchup from the dragon's point of view. Miss Drake, a 3,000-year-old dragon, is initially annoyed when Winifred, 10, barges into her hidden lair beneath a San Francisco mansion. It seems that Winnie's widowed mom has inherited the house from Miss Drake's most recent and still sharply missed human pet, Fluffy (aka Great-Aunt Amelia). The irritating child has been left a key and a charge to take care of the lonely dragon. Being a responsible sort (as well as a shapechanger and a thoroughly modern dragon with a smartphone and a debit card), Miss Drake reluctantly takes Winnie under her wing or tries to, as the strong-willed child has ideas of her own. Despite their differences, the two make a good team, as they prove in narrowly averting major disaster to the city and its magical community, after a flock of creatures Winnie has drawn in a special sketchbook come to life. In vignettes that open each chapter, illustrator GrandPré depicts the diverse creatures, along with glimpses of dragon, child, and various significant items with her customary flair and expertise. Warm humor, magical mishaps, and the main characters' budding mutual respect and affection combine to give this opener for a planned series a special shine that will draw readers and leave them impatient for sequels.--Peters, John Copyright 2015 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

In this series launch, Yep (the Dragon quartet), collaborating for the first time with his wife, Ryder (Won't You Be My Kissaroo?), again conjures up a world where dragons and humans interact, and the results are heartwarming and quite funny. Miss Drake, a shapeshifting dragon, is still mourning the death of her human pet, a woman she called Fluffy, when Fluffy's impetuous great-niece, Winnie, barges into her lair. "I could see she would be rather impossible to train," sniffs Miss Drake, whose scorn shifts to admiration as the two begin to bond with each other. After Winnie fills the pages of a magical sketchbook with drawings of fantastical creatures, the menacing "sketchlings" escape, and Winnie and Miss Drake join forces to track them down and return them to the book. Their mutual grief-Winnie's heartache over the death of her father parallels Miss Drake's loss of Fluffy-gives a moving underpinning to the magical escapades. Miss Drake's arch narration and the sharp back-and-forth between the characters create an enchanting story, accented by GrandPré's whimsical b&w spot illustrations. Ages 8-12. (Mar.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-When a dragon loses her longtime "pet" human, she is surprised to find herself now paired with the woman's great-niece, Winnie, a curious and capable 10-year-old. Though Miss Drake is a curmudgeonly dragon, she gradually warms to her new companion and introduces her to the magical creatures that live secretly in their city of San Francisco. Miss Drake narrates the tale with an engaging, whimsical tone. She is proud, snobbish, and modern; her human disguises reflect the latest fashions, and she keeps in touch with magical friends via cell phone. Her impatience with Winnie develops into respect and affection as she observes the girl in action, and their relationship is convincing and enjoyable. Introductions to the characters and the hidden magical world proceed rather slowly, and repeated hints at dangers to come are too obvious to generate much drama. Action finally begins when Winnie's sketches of magical creatures come to life and the two companions try to recapture them all. This task takes on a surprising twist when the identity of the final creature is revealed. Though even the climactic battle scenes are not terrifically suspenseful, the resolution is convincing and satisfying. With a black-and-white spot illustration opening most chapters, an engaging narrator, and a consistently fluid writing style, this title makes a fine dragon choice for readers not yet ready for more weighty fantasy novels.-Steven Engelfried, Wilsonville Public Library, OR (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.