Cover image for Marisol McDonald doesn't match
Title:
Marisol McDonald doesn't match
Author:
Brown, Monica, 1969-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Children's Book Press : Distributed to the book trade by Publishers Group West, [2011]

©2011
Physical Description:
31 pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
A creative, unique, bilingual Peruvian Scottish-American-soccer-playing artist celebrates her uniqueness.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
580 Lexile

AD 580 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.8 0.5 146488.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.3 1 Quiz: 55312.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780892392353
Format :
Book

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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

Marisol McDonald has flaming red hair and nut-brown skin. Polka dots and stripes are her favorite combination. She prefers peanut butter and jelly burritos in her lunch box. To Marisol, these seemingly mismatched things make perfect sense together. Other people wrinkle their nose in confusion at Marisol--can't she just choose one or the other? Try as she might, in a world where everyone tries to put this biracial, Peruvian-Scottish-American girl into a box, Marisol McDonald doesn't match. And that's just fine with her.


Author Notes

MONICA BROWN, Ph.D., is the author of award-winning bilingual books for children, including My Name Is Celia: The Life of Celia Cruz/Me llamo Celia: La vida de Celia Cruz (Luna Rising), a recipient of the Americas Award for Children's Literature and a Pura Belpre Honor. Her latest book, Side by Side/Lado a Lado (HarperCollins) was nominated as an Outstanding Literary Work for Children in the NAACP Image Awards. She is a Professor of English at Northern Arizona University, specializing in U.S. Latino Literature and Multicultural Literature. She also writes and publishes scholarly work with a Latino/a focus and numerous scholarly articles and chapters on Latino/a literature and cultural studies. She lives with her husband and two daughters in Flagstaff, Arizona. SARA PALACIOS was born and raised in Mexico City. She holds degrees in Graphic Design, Illustration, and Digital Graphic Techniques from universities in Mexico, and is currently pursuing her MFA in Illustration at the Academy of Art in San Francisco. She has worked as a freelance illustrator for Santillana, McGraw-Hill, SM, and others. Sara divides her time between San Francisco, California, and Mexico City, Mexico.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

The vivacious Peruvian-Scottish-American protagonist of this bilingual book has brown skin and hair "the color of fire." Her friends tell her that she "doesn't match," because of her appearance and her wardrobe, but when Marisol tones down her style, she realizes that it doesn't feel right. Palacio's collage work incorporates newsprint, vibrant patterns, and Peruvian motifs, echoing the message about being true to oneself. Ages 4-8. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Marisol McDonald has brown skin, freckles, and hair the color of fire. She pairs polka dots with stripes and eats peanut butter and jelly burritos. She's a Peruvian-Scottish-American who is perfect just the way she is. Why not have a game of soccer-playing pirates or mix cursive with print? That makes sense to Marisol. But others seem to see things differently. When another student issues a matching challenge to Marisol, she has to decide if she will conform simply to show that she can. In this lively bilingual book, Marisol is brought to life in both English and Spanish through Brown's dynamic prose, Palacios's vibrant illustrations, and Dominguez's outstanding translation. This fun book allows readers to meet a wonderful character. Children get a glimpse of what it means to grow up in a biracial family and have other people trying to define what is "normal." The story encourages readers to embrace their uniqueness and be exactly who they are.-Veronica Corral, Charlotte Mecklenburg Library, NC (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.