Cover image for Murder at the Chase : a Langham and Dupré mystery
Title:
Murder at the Chase : a Langham and Dupré mystery
Author:
Brown, Eric, 1960- , author.
Publication Information:
Sutton : Severn House, 2014.
Physical Description:
218 pages ; 23 cm
Summary:
July, 1955. Fellow writer Alastair Endicott has requested Donald Langham's help in discovering what happened to his father Edward, who has disappeared without a trace from inside his locked study. The elder Endicott had been researching a biography of the notorious Satanist Vivien Stafford. Could there be a connection to his disappearance?
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780727884251
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Crime writer sleuth Donald Langham is faced with the classic locked-room conundrum in this engaging historical mystery
July, 1955. Donald Langham has interrupted his romantic break in rural Suffolk with the delectable Maria Dupre to assist a fellow writer. Alastair Endicott has requested Langham's help in discovering what's happened to his father, Edward, who seems to have disappeared without trace from inside his locked study.

Before he vanished, the elder Endicott had been researching a book on the notorious Satanist Vivian Stafford. Could the proposed biography have something to do with his disappearance? Does local resident Stafford really possess supernatural powers, as some believe?

As Langham and Dupre question those around them, it becomes clear that there have been strange goings-on in the sleepy village of Humble Barton. But is the village really haunted - or does someone merely want it to look that way? With a further shocking discovery, the case takes a disturbing new twist.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Here's the second in a new series (following 2013's Murder by the Book) featuring British mystery writer Donald Langham and his rather attractive sidekick, his literary agent, Maria Dupre. Alastair Endicott's father has gone missing; Endicott asks Donald to help him find out how the man could have vanished from his locked study. Could the missing man's latest work in progress, a biography of a notorious satanist, be connected to his disappearance? A ripping-good period piece (it's set in the mid-1950s), the novel offers a pair of engaging protagonists, a compelling story (a good locked-room mystery is always a treat), and some seriously good plot twists. Brown has said online that his intent here was to debunk mysticism and the occult; and he definitely does that, but not in a mean-spirited way. It's a very well put together novel, with a solid rational core, but the author also does a fine job of exploring why people might believe so strongly in the occult, and why a charismatic occultist (modeled to some degree after Aleister Crowley), could attract such a large following.--Pitt, David Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Brown's pleasing sequel to 2013's Murder by the Book takes mystery writer Donald Langham and his girlfriend, Marie Dupré, to Suffolk, England, in the summer of 1955 for a romantic holiday. When Donald and Marie learn that a friend's father, Edward Endicott, has disappeared from his locked study at his place in Humble Barton, they switch into sleuthing mode. Endicott, "an ex-Hollywood screenwriter who penned mystery thrillers," was working on a biography of a Victorian-era Satanist self-described as a "confidant of the Devil himself." Some in Humble Barton suspect supernatural forces are afoot, but a skeptical Donald and Marie work with the local police toward a rational solution, while enjoying country walks and providing comfort to a blackmail victim. For all the criminal goings-on, Brown doesn't generate much suspense, but his well-told tale offers plenty of unexpected twists. Agatha Christie fans will find a lot to like. Agent: John Jarrold, John Jarrold Literary Agency (U.K.). (Dec.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Crime writer Donald Langham and Maria Dupre, a literary agent's assistant, have decided to take a vacation to romantic, rural Suffolk, where Donald plans to propose. It's 1955, and London is still recovering from the privations of World War II. When Donald learns that the father of a writer friend has vanished from his locked study at Endicott's Chase, near the village of Humble Barton, where Donald and Maria are staying, he is intrigued. It seems that Elliot Endicott had been writing a biography of Vivian Stafford, a notorious Satanist; could that be a clue to his disappearance? VERDICT Brown's charming English locked-room mystery (after Murder by the Book) features a well-crafted and exciting plot and two attractive protagonists who epitomize a postwar English generation willing to reach across class lines. For readers who enjoy classic Golden Age mysteries. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.