Cover image for As an oak tree grows
Title:
As an oak tree grows
Author:
Karas, G. Brian, author, illustrator.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Nancy Paulsen Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA), [2014]
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Summary:
"From 1775 to the present, the landscape around a lone oak tree goes through significant changes"--
General Note:
Issued with a poster in a pocket on page 3 of cover.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780399252334
Format :
Book

Available:*

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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Oversize
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

A child plants an acorn. An oak tree sprouts. For the next two hundred years, generations of people come and go, but the tree remains standing strong, sole witness to the remarkable changes taking place all around it. This inventive picture book relays history from a unique perspective, showing how much the world can transform from a single vantage point. In the span of two hundred years, methods of transportation, communication and energy use progress rapidly while other things hardly seem to change at all. Perfect for budding historians and nature enthusiasts alike, the time-lapse quality of the detail-packed illustrations will draw readers in as they pore over each spread to spot the changes that come with each new era. A fact-filled poster is included to add to the fun. Praise for G. Brain Karas On Earth 'Original and appealing . . . This ambitious nonfiction picture book might be a good place to start small children thing big.' Booklist Atlantic 'Both playful and inventive. A sureness and sophistication of design underlie the compostions . . . Creative introduction to the Atlantic.' Booklist


Author Notes

Children's author and illustrator, G. Brian Karas was born in Milford, Connecticut in 1957. After graduating from Paier School of Art, he worked as a greeting card artist and a commercial illustrator. Home on the Bayou, a Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor, was his first illustrated book. Since then, he has illustrated over seventy books for children. Titles authored and/or illustrated by Karas have won numerous other awards. Saving Sweetness written by Diane Stanley was a Capitol Choices Noteworthy Book for Children in 1996, received a Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books Blue Ribbon in 1996, and was a School Library Journal Best Book of 1996. Like Butter on Pancakes by Jonathan London was a School Library Journal Best Book of 1995. The Class Artist, written and illustrated by Karas, was a Smithsonian Magazine's Notable Book for Children in 2001 and received the Oppenheim Toy Portfolio 2002 Best Book Gold Award.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

On a hillside overlooking woods and water, an Indian boy plants an acorn, which sprouts in 1775. Fast-forward to 1800: the forests are gone, farmers plow the land, and a house sits beside the sturdy young oak tree. In the distance, a tiny community has sprung up beside the water. Each turn of the page takes readers 25 years forward, with the dates marked on a time line at the bottom of the pages. As the oak grows larger, the people's clothing and technology gradually change, while the nearby town stretches farther into the countryside. In the year 2000, a storm destroys the tree. But beside the stump, an acorn sprouts. Each picture shows the tree from the same vantage point, but the scene shifts continually to reflect varied human activities as well as changing seasons and times of day. While the size of the tree's stump may be exaggerated, the appealing pencil-and-gouache illustrations chronicle the passage of time in a memorable way. Reminiscent of picture books such as Virginia Lee Burton's The Little House (1942) and Lark Carrier's A Tree's Tale (1996).--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Karas (On Earth) juxtaposes a steadily growing oak tree with the changing landscape around it in this engaging tale of transformation and constancy. It opens with a Native American boy planting an acorn on a forested hill. Subsequent scenes and to-the-point narration reveal how the forest gives way to farmland and a town, which grows into a city. More than 200 years pass and the oak provides a home for animals, swings, and a tree fort. Gouache and pencil illustrations maintain the same perspective throughout, inviting comparisons between elements in each spread and their more modern counterparts that follow (a canoe on the bay is replaced by schooners, steamships, and motorboats). After a poignant penultimate spread (logs are sawed up and driven away after lightning takes the giant tree), the story comes full circle with a sapling. A rapidly modernizing society, the resultant impact on the environment, and the constant, observant presence of nature are themes readers can start to grasp with this book. More simply, it's a charming cycle-of-life story and an engaging chronicle of American urban history. Ages 5-8. Agent: Brenda Bowen, Sanford J. Greenburger Associates. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-This engaging picture book charts the history of an oak tree that's more than 200 years old. Each page lists a year in the life of the tree, starting with an acorn planted by a young boy in 1775. The mighty oak survives decades of droughts and snowstorms until it is eventually felled by a lightning storm, at which point its life cycle continues in the form of "furniture, firewood and mulch." Karas's straightforward narration is informative and reflective. Detailed watercolor illustrations dramatically show the landscape evolving from rural to urban over time, also depicting the introduction of electricity, automobiles, and other new technologies. Amid this rapid change, the oak is steadfast, providing a nesting spot for birds, and beauty and shade for the community. This fascinating time capsule will spark nature and history discussions.-Linda Ludke, London Public Library, Ontario, Canada (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.