Cover image for You are not my friend, but I miss you
Title:
You are not my friend, but I miss you
Author:
Kirk, Daniel, author, illustrator.
Publication Information:
New York : Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2014.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
A sock monkey becomes angry with a stuffed dog while they are playing and declares they are no longer friends, but soon learns that he may not have been a good friend, either.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781419712364
Format :
Book

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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

When two friends--a sock monkey and a plush toy dog--get into an argument during playtime, Monkey gets his feelings hurt and proclaims, "You are not my friend!" But when he takes his ball to find someone new to play with, he quickly learns that maybe he hasn't been a very good friend, either. Bestselling author/illustrator Daniel Kirk uses bold and humorous illustrations to convey the important message that sharing and other acts of friendship are two-way streets.

Praise for You Are Not My Friend, But I Miss You
"Kirk's skillfully paced mix of vignettes, close-ups and long shots guide readers smoothly through this emotional odyssey."
-- Kirkus Reviews

" His frequent use of bold, large-scale drawing captures Monkey's equally outsize temperament, while the emphatic, minimal text is subtly poignant and supremely performable."
-- Publishers Weekly


Author Notes

Daniel Kirk has illustrated a number of popular and bestselling books for children, including Library Mouse , which Booklist heralded in a starred review as "fun, fun, fun." He lives in Glen Ridge, New Jersey.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

The sock-monkey protagonist of Kirk's latest is outraged that his friend Dog is playing with his red ball. Dog didn't ask permission, and Monkey has to wait to reclaim the ball. With the toy safely back in his grasp, Monkey goes on a tirade about how Dog would not share. As Monkey rants and raves and decides that it is better to play alone than with a friend who does not share, the illustrations reveal that Dog never shared the red ball because he could never before get his paws on it. In other words, the evidence shows that it is Monkey who is not good at sharing. Although Dog is part of the story, this is very much Monkey's monologue. Monkey dominates the digitally colored pen-and-ink illustrations, and the use of all caps and bold fonts emphasizes Monkey's intensity as he works his way from self-righteous indignation to lonely realization that he has not been a good friend. The book's message is hardly subtle, but children will relate to Monkey's epiphany that it takes two to share.--Dean, Kara Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Dog swipes Monkey's red ball, and Monkey (who is actually a sock monkey with a tuft of red yarn for hair) decides that they're through. After all, Monkey says, "Friends are supposed to share," although from the looks of the spot illustrations that accompany this declaration of principles, Monkey's idea of sharing is not very generous (whether the duo are snacking, teeter-tottering, or reading, Monkey also keeps the ball to himself). But never mind that, or as Monkey says in a moment of high dudgeon, "HAH!" Dog is obviously a bad friend, and Monkey has two perfectly good alternatives: find a new friend or play by himself. Kirk (the Library Mouse series) knows children's sense of injustice, entitlement, and egocentrism like the back of his hand. His frequent use of bold, large-scale drawing captures Monkey's equally outsize temperament, while the emphatic, minimal text is subtly poignant and supremely performable, with lots of typographic cues to pout, shout, and (finally) reconcile after Monkey realizes that, just maybe, "I wasn't a good friend." Ages 4-8. Agent: Barry Goldblatt, Barry Goldblatt Literary. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Here, Kirk explores playground politics through the thoughts and feelings of an expressive sock monkey. Monkey and his best friend have a falling out when Dog takes his red ball and runs off. When Dog won't share, Monkey grabs the toy away from him and declares, "YOU cannot play with it anymore!" His moment of triumph is fleeting, however. Assailed by memories of all he has shared with Dog, poor Monkey tries to deal with his conflicting emotions. When his efforts to find a new friend fail, Monkey realizes that perhaps he hasn't been a great friend to Dog, either. Monkey approaches the blue and white pup and asks, "Will you come and play with me?" On the last page, the pals happily begin a game of catch. The digitized pen-and-ink illustrations add depth and texture to the story. The series of gracefully crafted spreads eloquently portrays the ups and downs of Monkey's emotional journey. Young readers will identify with the plush, huggable characters and sympathize with Monkey as he struggles to sort out his feelings. Pair this compelling story of friendship and the importance of sharing with Randall de Seve's Peanut & Fifi Have a Ball (Dial, 2013).- Linda L. Walkins, Saint Joseph Preparatory High School, Boston, MA (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.