Cover image for Rain reign
Title:
Rain reign
Author:
Martin, Ann M., 1955- , author.
Edition:
Unabridged.
Publication Information:
Grand Haven, MI : Brilliance Audio, Inc., [2014]
Physical Description:
4 audio discs (4 hr., 9 min.) : CD audio, digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
Rose Howard has OCD, Asperger's syndrome, and an obsession with homonyms. She gave her dog Rain a name with two homonyms. Rose and Rain are practically inseparable. And they are often home alone, as Rose's father spends most evenings at a bar, and doesn't have much patience for his special-needs daughter. Just as a storm hits town, Rain goes missing. Rose's father shouldn't have let Rain out. Now Rose has to find her dog, even if it means leaving her routines and safe places to search.
General Note:
Title from container.

Compact discs.

Duration: 4:09:00.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781491530504

9781491530528
Format :
Audiobook on CD

Available:*

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Material Type
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Elma Library J FICTION CD Juvenile Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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North Park Branch Library J FICTION CD Juvenile Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Summary

Summary

Rose Howard has OCD, Asperger's syndrome, and an obsession with homonyms (even her name is a homonym). She gave her dog Rain a name with two homonyms (Reign, Rein), which, according to Rose's rules of homonyms, is very special. Rain was a lost dog Rose's father brought home. Rose and Rain are practically inseparable. And they are often home alone, as Rose's father spends most evenings at a bar, and doesn't have much patience for his special-needs daughter.

Just as a storm hits town, Rain goes missing. Rose's father shouldn't have let Rain out. Now Rose has to find her dog, even if it means leaving her routines and safe places to search. Rose will find Rain, but so will Rain's original owners.

Hearts will break and spirits will soar for this powerful story, brilliantly told from Rose's point of view.


Author Notes

Ann Mathews Martin was born on August 12, 1955 in Princeton, New Jersey. She received a degree in elementary education and psychology from Smith College. She worked as a teacher, was an editor of children's books for both Bantam and Scholastic, and then became a full-time writer.

She is the author of several series including the Baby-sitters Club series, Baby-Sitters Little Sister series, California Diaries series, and Main Street series. Her other works include Ten Kids No Pets, Here Today, On Christmas Eve, and Rain Reign.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Rose, a fifth-grader who has been diagnosed with Asperger syndrome, is often teased at school about her obsession with homonyms and her steadfast conviction that everyone should follow the rules at all times. Rose lives with her harsh, troubled father, but it's Uncle Weldon who cares for her in the ways that matter most. Still, her father did give her Rain, a stray dog that comforts and protects Rose. After Rain is lost in a storm and recovered, Rose learns that her dog has an identification microchip. Though she fully grasps what that means, Rose is driven by the unwavering belief that she must follow the rules, find Rain's former owners, and give the dog back to them. Simplicity, clarity, and emotional resonance are hallmarks of Rose's first-person narrative, which offers an unflinching view of her world from her perspective. Her outlook may be unconventional, but her approach is matter-of-fact and her observations are insightful. Readers will be moved by the raw portrayal of Rose's difficult home life, her separation from other kids at school, and her loss of the dog that has loved her and provided a buffer from painful experiences. A strong story told in a nuanced, highly accessible way.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Starred Review. Rose Howard is a high-functioning autistic fifth-grader, and her preoccupation with homophones, her insistence on rules being followed to the letter of the law, and her difficulties reading social cues and understanding emotions are giving her trouble at school and frustrating her impatient and often angry single father. Rose's own feelings of anxiety and worry are viscerally felt when her dog, Rain, gets lost after a storm wreaks havoc in her small New York town. As Rose's sense of order is disrupted by floods, uprooted trees, and destroyed buildings, she methodically follows a plan to bring Rain home, though things don't go as expected. Newbery Honor author Martin (A Corner of the Universe) is extremely successful in capturing Rose's perspective and personality; Rose can't always recognize when she is being treated unkindly (it's no rare occurrence), but readers will see what she is up against, as well as the efforts of those who reach out to her. Filled with integrity and determination, Rose overcomes significant obstacles in order to do what is right. Ages 9-12. Agent: Amy Berkower, Writers House. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-Rose is different from the other children in her class in many ways. She struggles to control the obsessions and outbursts that are symptomatic of her high-functioning autism. She is fascinated by homophones, or homonyms, as most people know them, and prime numbers. Rose uses patterns and habits to gain some control over her days. Her mother left when Rose was two, so she lives with her father, and is also cared for by her Uncle Weldon, who lives nearby, and who often shows Rose the most understanding and compassion. When her father brings home a lost dog, Rose names her Rain, since she was found in the rain, and "rain" is a homonym (with "reign"). During a superstorm, her father lets Rain out, and Rose's beloved companion is lost. Rose and her uncle finally find Rain after a long and difficult search, but they learn that Rain is actually Olivia, the pet of a family who lost everything in the storm. Told through Rose's voice, the story gives readers the perspective of someone who sees life in black-and-white, and who struggles when rules are broken, or routines are changed. The characters around Rose develop incrementally as readers witness their reactions to her obsessions and her struggles. Though Rose's story is often heartbreaking, her matter-of-fact narration provides moments of humor. Readers will empathize with Rose, who finds strength and empowerment through her unique way of looking at the world. A first purchase.-MaryAnn Karre, West Middle School, Binghamton, NY (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

1 Who I Am--A Girl Named Rose (Rows) I am Rose Howard and my first name has a homonym. To be accurate, it has a homophone , which is a word that's pronounced the same as another word but spelled differently. My homophone name is Rows. Most people say homonym when they mean homophone . My teacher, Mrs. Kushel, says this is a common mistake. "What's the difference between making a mistake and breaking a rule?" I want to know. "Making a mistake is accidental. Breaking a rule is deliberate." "But if--" I start to say. Mrs. Kushel rushes on. "It's all right to say 'homonym' when we mean 'homophone.' That's called a colloquialism." "'Breaking' has a homonym," I tell her. "'Braking.'" I like homonyms a lot. And I like words. Rules and numbers too. Here is the order in which I like these things: 1. Words (especially homonyms) 2. Rules 3. Numbers (especially prime numbers) I'm going to tell you a story. It's a true story, which makes it a piece of nonfiction. This is how you tell a story: First you introduce the main character. I'm writing this story about me, so I am the main character. My first name has a homonym, and I gave my dog a homonym name too. Her name is Rain, which is special because it has two homonyms--rein and reign. I will write more about Rain in Chapter Two. Chapter Two will be called "My Dog, Rain (Reign, Rein)." Something important about the word write is that it has three homonyms--right, rite, and wright. That's the only group of four homonyms I've thought of. If I ever think of another four-homonym group, it will be a red-letter day. I live with my father, Wesley Howard, and neither of his names has a homonym. From our porch you can see our front yard and our driveway and our road, which is called Hud Road. Road has two homonyms--rowed and rode. On the other side (sighed) of the road is a little forest, and through the trees you can see the New York Thruway. The word see has a homonym--sea. But even better, sees has two homonyms--seas and seize. I'm in fifth grade at Hatford Elementary. There's only one elementary school in Hatford, New York, and only one fifth-grade classroom in the school, and I'm in it. Most of my classmates are ten years old or about to turn eleven. I'm almost twelve because no one is sure what to do with me in school. I've stayed back for two semesters, which is a total of one year. (1/2 + 1/2 = 1.) Some of the things I get teased about are following the rules and always talking about homonyms. Mrs. Leibler is my aide and she sits with me in Mrs. Kushel's room. She sits in an adult-size chair next to my fifth-grade-size chair and rests her hand on my arm when I blurt something out in the middle of math. Or, if I whap myself in the head and start to cry, she'll say, "Rose, do you need to step into the hall for a moment?" Mrs. Leibler tells me that there are things worth talking about besides homonyms and rules and prime numbers. She encourages me to think up conversation starters. Some conversation starters about me that do not have anything to do with homonyms or rules or prime numbers are: I live in a house that faces northeast. (After I say that, I ask the person I'm trying to have a conversation with, "And which direction does your house face?") Down the road, 0.7 miles from my house is the J & R Garage, where my father sometimes works as a mechanic, and 0.1 miles farther along is a bar called The Luck of the Irish, where my father goes after work. There is nothing between my house and the J & R Garage except trees and the road. (Tell me some things about your neighborhood.) I have an uncle named Weldon, who is my father's younger brother. (And who else is in your family?) My official diagnosis is high-functioning autism, which some people call Asperger's syndrome. (Do you have a diagnosis?) I will finish up this part of my introduction by telling you that my mother does not live with my father and me. She ran away from our family when I was two. Therefore, the people living in my house are my father and me. The dog living in our house is Rain. Uncle Weldon lives 3.4 miles away on the other side of Hatford. The next part of my introduction is the setting of my story. I've already told you my geographic location--Hud Road in Hatford, New York. The historical moment in time in which this story begins is October of my year in fifth grade. Now I will tell you something troubling about fifth grade. It isn't as troubling as what happens later in the story when my father lets Rain outside during a hurricane, but it is still troubling. For the first time in my life I'm being sent home with weekly progress reports that I have to give to my father. The reports are written by Mrs. Leibler and read and signed by Mrs. Kushel, which is my teachers' way of saying that they're in agreement about my behavior. The reports list all of my notable behaviors for Monday through Friday. Some of the comments are nice, such as the ones about when I participate appropriately in a classroom discussion. But most of the comments make my father slam the reports onto the table and say, "Rose, for god's sake, keep your mouth closed when you think of a homonym," or, "Do you see any of the other kids clapping their hands over their ears and screaming when they hear the fire alarm?" In the last report Mrs. Leibler and Mrs. Kushel asked my father to schedule monthly meetings with them. Now he's supposed to go to Hatford Elementary on the third Friday of every month at 3:45 p.m. to discuss me. This is what he said when he read that: "I don't have time for meetings. This is way too much trouble, Rose. Why do you do these things?" He said that at 3:48 p.m. on a Friday when there was no work for him at the J & R Garage. Uncle Weldon heard about the monthly meetings on October 3rd at 8:10 in the evening when he was visiting my father and Rain and me. My father was standing at the front door, holding the letter in his hand and gazing out at the trees and the darkness. "These meetings are crap," he said. Uncle Weldon, who was sitting at the Formica kitchen table with me, looked at my father from under his eyelashes and said, "I could go, if you want." Uncle Weldon has a very soft voice. My father whipped around and pointed his finger at Weldon. "No! Rose is my responsibility. I can take care of things." Weldon lowered his head and didn't answer. But when my father turned around so that he was facing outside again, my uncle held up two crossed fingers, which was his signal to me that everything would be all right (write, rite, wright). I held up my fingers too (two, to), and we each touched our hearts with them. After that, Rain came into the kitchen and sat on my feet for a while. Then my uncle left. Then my father crumpled the letter from Mrs. Leibler and Mrs. Kushel and tossed it into the yard. That is the end of the introduction to me. Copyright © 2014 by Ann M. Martin Excerpted from Rain Reign by Ann M. Martin All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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