Cover image for Betty Bunny loves chocolate cake
Title:
Betty Bunny loves chocolate cake
Author:
Kaplan, Michael B.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Dial Books for Young Readers, 2011.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
From her first bite, young Betty Bunny likes chocolate cake so much that she claims she will marry it one day, and she has trouble learning to wait patiently until she can have her next taste.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Preschool

600 Lexile

AD 600 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader 3.3

Reading Counts! 3.4

Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.3 0.5 143950.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.4 2 Quiz: 54373.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780803734074
Format :
Book

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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Meet Betty Bunny.

She's proud to be a handful (because she doesn't know what that word means).

Her mommy wants her to have patience. She wants to have cake (because it tastes so much better than patience).


Author Notes

A native of Wayland, Massachusetts, Michael Kaplan wrote plays and musicals throughout high school and at Princeton University, where he attended college. Upon graduation he moved to New York where a number of his plays received productions and staged readings, primarily at The Ensemble Studio Theatre, where he is a member. For the past twenty-two years, he has lived in Los Angeles, working as a television writer and producer on a total of twelve different prime time shows for ABC, NBC, FOX, and UPN. His career as a comedy writer has included stints as a writer and Supervising Producer on two of television's most respected comedies, Roseanne and Frasier. For his work on the latter, he received an Emmy award, as a member of the producing staff, for best comedy series. He co-created and Executive Produced I'm In the Band for Disney XD. His new show, Dog With a Blog will be premiering on Disney Channel in the fall of 2012. He is the author of Betty Bunny Loves Chocolate Cake and Betty Bunny Wants Everything. He currently resides in Los Angeles with his wife and three children.Stephane Jorisch has illustrated numerous picture books, including New Year at the Pier, Granddad's Fishing Buddy, The Real Story of Stone Soup, and Jabberwocky, for which he won the prestigious Governor General's Award, the Canadian equivalent of the Caldecott. Mr. Jorisch lives with his wife and three children in Montreal, Canada.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Oh, the perils of obsession. After her first taste of chocolate cake, little Betty not only wants no other food but she literally thinks and speaks of nothing else for the rest of the day. A dinnertime tantrum amid flying veggies and mashed potatoes gets her sent to her room with no dessert at all, though her mother leaves her a piece of cake in the fridge. Next morning, Betty sneaks it into her pocket, carries it all day, and is shocked when it turns into a gooey mess. Does she learn patience or anything else from the experience? Well, no, as it turns out. Depicting a multisibling family of flop-eared bunnies in casual modern dress and settings, Jorisch's freely brushed watercolors capture Betty's fixation as well as her outsize personality. Rather than force a lesson or even try for a resolution, TV writer Kaplan simply invites readers to share, or at least enjoy, her rapture in this exuberant debut.--Peters, Joh. Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

The devil's food cake is in the details of this blithe yet emotionally honest book about the eponymous rabbit, a "handful" of a child who becomes deeply enamored of chocolate cake after her first bite. Much of the book's humor depends upon Betty's misunderstandings-especially the meanings of "handful" ("Betty Bunny knew that her mother and father loved her, and so being a handful must be very, very good") and patience. When Betty's mother insists she eat her healthy dinner before her cake, Betty throws a tantrum before agreeing to be more patient tomorrow. (She quickly reveals she doesn't quite have the concept down when she stealthily slips a piece of cake into her pocket, where it turns into a "brown goopy mess.") Readers will delight in feeling older and wiser than Betty, and both Jorisch (New Year at the Pier) and debut talent Kaplan demonstrate a sure handle on feisty modern family dynamics, whether in Betty's dreamy gaze as she declares, "I am going to marry chocolate cake," or her older brother's surly retort: "Whatever.... But you're going to have really weird-looking kids." Ages 3-5. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Betty Bunny is, according to her parents, a handful. This includes being a picky eater. Still, the first time she's coaxed into trying chocolate cake, it's love at first bite. She loves it so much, she wants to marry it. She can't wait for her next piece, which leads to a host of very funny misadventures. This is the tale of a child who needs to learn patience but can't quite get the hang of it. Kaplan fills the book with exuberance and laugh-out-loud dialogue. The text tends to be wordy and repetitive, though, and the net result is a book that may be too long for its intended audience. This problem is largely alleviated by Jorisch's adorable watercolor-gouache illustrations, which add loads of kid appeal. Postures, facial expressions, and situations are depicted with skill and humor- and the chocolate cake looks pretty good, too. A fun, surprise ending will leave readers smiling.-Susan Weitz, formerly at Spencer-Van Etten School District, Spencer, NY (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.