Cover image for Who we be : the colorization of America
Title:
Who we be : the colorization of America
Author:
Chang, Jeff, author.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition: October 2014.
Publication Information:
New York : St. Martin's Press, 2014.
Physical Description:
xii, 403 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
Summary:
"Race. A four-letter word. The greatest social divide in American life, a half-century ago and today. During that time, the U.S. has seen the most dramatic demographic and cultural shifts in its history, what can be called the colorization of America. But the same nation that elected its first Black president on a wave of hope--another four-letter word--is still plunged into endless culture wars. How do Americans see race now? How has that changed--and not changed--over the half-century? After eras framed by words like 'multicultural' and 'post-racial, ' do we see each other any more clearly? Who We Be remixes comic strips and contemporary art, campus protests and corporate marketing campaigns, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Trayvon Martin into a powerful, unusual, and timely cultural history of the idea of racial progress. In this follow-up to the award-winning classic Can't Stop Won't Stop : A History of the Hip-Hop Generation, Jeff Chang brings fresh energy, style, and sweep to the essential American story"--
Language:
English
Contents:
Seeing America -- A new culture, 1963-1979. Rainbow power : Morrie Turner and the kids ; After Jericho : the struggle against invisibility ; "The real thing" : lifestyling and its discontents ; Every man an artist, every artist a priest : the invention of multiculturalism ; Color theory : race trouble in the avant-garde -- Who are we? : 1980-1993. The end of the world as we know it : whiteness, the rainbow, and the culture wars ; Unity and reconciliation : the era of identity ; Imagine/ever wanting/to be : the fall of multiculturalism ; All the colors in the world : the mainstreaming of multiculturalism ; We are all multiculturalists now : visions of one America -- The colorization of America, 1993-2013. I am I be : identity in post time ; Demographobia : racial fears and colorized futures ; The wave : the hope of a new cultural majority ; Dis/union : the paradox of the post-racial moment ; Who we be : debt, community, and colorization -- Dreaming America.
ISBN:
9780312571290

9781250074898
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
E184.A1 C4425 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
E184.A1 C4425 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
E184.A1 C4425 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...
Searching...
E184.A1 C4425 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...
Searching...
E184.A1 C4425 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
E184.A1 C4425 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
E184.A1 C4425 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
E184.A1 C4425 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
E184.A1 C4425 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
E184.A1 C4425 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Race. A four-letter word. The greatest social divide in American life, a half-century ago and today.
During that time, the U.S. has seen the most dramatic demographic and cultural shifts in its history, what can be called the colorization of America. But the same nation that elected its first Black president on a wave of hope--another four-letter word--is still plunged into endless culture wars.
How do Americans see race now? How has that changed--and not changed--over the half-century? After eras framed by words like "multicultural" and "post-racial," do we see each other any more clearly?
Who We Be remixes comic strips and contemporary art, campus protests and corporate marketing campaigns, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Trayvon Martin into a powerful, unusual, and timely cultural history of the idea of racial progress. In this follow-up to the award-winning classic Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation , Jeff Chang brings fresh energy, style, and sweep to the essential American story.


Author Notes

Jeff Chang's first book was the award-winning Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation . He has been a USA Ford Fellow in Literature and was named by The Utne Reader one of "50 Visionaries Who Are Changing Your World." He is the Executive Director of the Institute for Diversity in the Arts at Stanford University.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

By 2042, there will be no majority race in the U.S. What will that mean? Cultural analyst Chang (Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation, 2005) looks back on the complicated history of race in the U.S. and ahead at the demographic promise of a much more racially diverse nation. Chang notes that the nation has been colorizing for centuries, from slavery through desegregation and an uneasy, halfhearted integration. Drawing on media images and interviews, Chang chronicles ideas of race since the mid-1960s. He features cartoonists from Morrie Turner (Wee Pals) to Aaron McGruder (The Boondocks) and their personal journeys as they navigated a profession with few blacks and reflected on changing images of race. He also explores the branding of multiculturalism seen in ads for brands including Coca-Cola and Benetton. His larger focus is on how art, music, and commerce have reflected changes in attitudes and images of race, from minstrelsy to militancy to multiculturalism. In this engaging look at race and culture, Chang raises questions but admits there are no simple or easy answers as culture continues to evolve.--Bush, Vanessa Copyright 2014 Booklist


Library Journal Review

Beginning with the 1960s and continuing until the fatal shooting of the African American teenager Trayvon Martin, this book examines advertising, comics, media, and fine arts as they relate to the politics of multiculturalism in America. Chang (executive director, Inst. for Diversity in the Arts, Stanford Univ.; Can't Stop Won't Stop) states that he does not mean to write the definitive work on the subject of multiculturalism, preferring to emphasize lesser-known artists and movements. Because the subject of the book is nebulous, the chapters can feel disconnected. One section discusses conservative political strategies while the next includes a biography of an obscure poet. However, engaging and fast-paced writing makes the volume worth reading, and the inclusion of Native American, Asian American, and Latino artists strengthens the theme. For a reader interested in the history of identity art, this work can bring up new names to research. VERDICT Recommended for those interested in race relations in America, as well as readers seeking background information on the author's previous works. Jessica Spears, Monroe Coll. Lib., Bronx, NY (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Historically, the US has been defined by whiteness. Stephen Douglas (1858) was famously paraphrased as saying, "this government of ours was founded on the white basis. It was founded by the white man for the benefit of the white man." This was popularized and simplified as "This is a white man's country." Yet massive demographic shifts since the 1960s and the rise of multiculturalism and the culture wars have given people of color new prominence. Chang (Stanford) calls the massive shifts that began taking place as the civil rights movement ebbed "colorization." Weaving together art history, politics, cartoons, and media, he suggests that American visual culture has been "colorized." Never in US history have so many nonwhite people been so visible in commercials, advertising, politics, or the media. But what good has it done? What difference has it made? Race continues to haunt the nation like a painful wound, a blind spot, marked by silence, denial, evasion, and amnesia. Whether one discusses Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, or the deportation of "illegal" immigrants, the agony of race persists. The war between the ethnocentric nation and the ideal of a universal nation continues. Great photos. A masterpiece. Required reading. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. --Wayne C. Glasker, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Camden


Table of Contents

Introduction: Seeing Americap. 1
Part 1 A New Culture, 1963-1979
Chapter 1 Rainbow Power: Morrie Turner and the Kidsp. 17
Chapter 2 After Jericho: The Struggle Against Invisibilityp. 38
Chapter 3 "The Real Thing": Lifestyling and Its Discontentsp. 55
Chapter 4 Every Man an Artist, Every Artist a Priest: The Invention of Multiculturalismp. 67
Chapter 5 Color Theory: Race Trouble in the Avant-Gardep. 79
Part 2 Who Are We? 1980-1993
Chapter 6 The End of the World As We Know It: Whiteness, the Rainbow, and the Culture Warsp. 101
Chapter 7 Unity and Reconciliation: The Era of Identityp. 126
Chapter 8 Imagine/Ever Wanting/to Be: The Fall of Multiculturalismp. 143
Chapter 9 All the Colors in the World: The Mainstreaming of Multiculturalismp. 169
Chapter 10 We Are All Multiculturalists Now: Visions of One Americap. 191
Part 3 The Colorization of America, 1993-2013
Chapter 11 I Am I Be: Identity in Post Timep. 213
Chapter 12 Demographobia: Racial Fears and Colorized Futuresp. 241
Chapter 13 The Wave: The Hope of a New Cultural Majorityp. 255
Chapter 14 Dis/Union: The Paradox of the Post-Racial Momentp. 273
Chapter 15 Who We Be: Debt, Community, and Colorizationp. 291
Epilogue: Dreaming Americap. 317
Acknowledgmentsp. 345
Notesp. 349
Indexp. 391