Cover image for The Nazis next door : how America became a safe haven for Hitler's men
Title:
The Nazis next door : how America became a safe haven for Hitler's men
Author:
Lichtblau, Eric.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014.
Physical Description:
xvii, 266 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
"The shocking story of how America became one of the world's safest postwar havens for Nazis. Until recently, historians believed America gave asylum only to key Nazi scientists after World War II, along with some less famous perpetrators who managed to sneak in and who eventually were exposed by Nazi hunters. But the truth is much worse, and has been covered up for decades: the CIA and FBI brought thousands of perpetrators to America as possible assets against their new Cold War enemies. When the Justice Department finally investigated and learned the truth, the results were classified and buried. Using the dramatic story of one former perpetrator who settled in New Jersey, conned the CIA into hiring him, and begged for the agency's support when his wartime identity emerged, Eric Lichtblau tells the full, shocking story of how America became a refuge for hundreds of postwar Nazis"--
Language:
English
Contents:
Prologue: A Name from the Past -- Liberation -- The Good Nazis -- "Minor War Crimes" -- Echoes from Argentina -- Tilting at Swastikas -- In the Pursuit of Science -- Out of the Shadows -- "An Ugly Blot" -- The Sins of the Father -- A Good Party Spoiled -- "An Innocent Man" -- Backlash -- Ivan the Terrible -- The Road to Ponary -- Appendix.
ISBN:
9780547669199
Format :
Book

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E743.5 .L49 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

The shocking story of how America became one of the world's safest postwar havens for Nazis
Thousands of Nazis -- from concentration camp guards to high-level officers in the Third Reich -- came to the United States after World War II and quietly settled into new lives. They had little trouble getting in. With scant scrutiny, many gained entry on their own as self-styled war "refugees," their pasts easily disguised and their war crimes soon forgotten. But some had help and protection from the U.S. government. The CIA, the FBI, and the military all put Hitler's minions to work as spies, intelligence assets, and leading scientists and engineers, whitewashing their histories.

For the first time, once-secret government records and interviews tell the full story not only of the Nazi scientists brought to America, but of the German spies and con men who followed them and lived for decades as ordinary citizens. Only years after their arrival did private sleuths and government prosecutors begin trying to identify the hidden Nazis. But even then, American intelligence agencies secretly worked to protect a number of their prized spies from exposure. Today, a few Nazis still remain on our soil.

Investigative reporter Eric Lichtblau, relying on a trove of newly discovered documents and scores of interviews with participants in this little-known chapter of postwar history, tells the shocking and shameful story of how America became a safe haven for Hitler's men.


Author Notes

ERIC LICHTBLAU is a New York Times Washington bureau investigative reporter. In 2006 he won a Pulitzer Prize for stories on the NSA's warrantless wiretapping. He also has appeared as a frequent guest on CNN, PBS, NPR, CSPAN, and ABC. He is the author of Bush's Law: The Remaking of American Justice.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Starred Review. Until recently, public perception has been that only a small number of Nazis settled in the United States after World War II. Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Lichtblau's (New York Times) thoroughly riveting account demolishes this myth by revealing the backstory of how and why as many as 10,000 Nazis arrived postwar on America's shores. Through interviews and archival research, the author demonstrates the involvement of the military, the CIA, and the FBI in turning these World War II enemies into Cold War allies in the fight against communism by scrubbing their wartime histories, assisting them in gaming the immigration system to gain residency and citizenship, harnessing their knowledge to fight the Soviet Union, and shielding them from investigations. Lichtblau documents the lengths to which federal agencies would go to protect these assets. In one instance, congressional members derailed an immigration service investigation into the chief scientist of NASA's aerospace medical division, Hubertus Strughold-a man who had knowledge of many human experiments performed on prisoners in concentration camps. Rich in detail, this work is a necessary corrective to our understanding of postwar American history. VERDICT An essential read for all those interested in World War II, the Cold War, and 20th-century history.-Chris Sauder, Round Rock P.L., TX (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

### Excerpted from The Nazis Next Door: How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler's Men by Eric Lichtblau All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

Prologue: A Name from the Pastp. xi
1 Liberationp. 1
2 The Good Nazisp. 14
3 "Minor War Crimes"p. 41
4 Echoes from Argentinap. 66
5 Tilting at Swastikasp. 77
6 In the Pursuit of Sciencep. 90
7 Out of the Shadowsp. 106
8 "An Ugly Blot"p. 125
9 The Sins of the Fatherp. 136
10 A Good Party Spoiledp. 152
11 "An Innocent Man"p. 170
12 Backlashp. 181
13 Ivan the Terriblep. 199
14 The Road to Ponaryp. 213
Epiloguep. 229
Map: Locations of Nazis Pursued by the Office of Special Investigationsp. 232
Acknowledgmentsp. 234
Notesp. 236
Indexp. 258