Cover image for Passion play
Title:
Passion play
Author:
Nichols, Peter, 1927-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
London : Eyre Methuen, 1981.
Physical Description:
106 pages ; 19 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780413479105

9780413478009
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PR6064.I2 P37 Adult Mass Market Paperback Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

"More than "Betrayal or The Real Thing, Passion Play" makes one feel the ugliness of deceit, the escalating anguish that can come from loss of trust... Has an intensity of feeling, a moral scope and a theatrical inventiveness that neither of the others matches."-"The Times"


Author Notes

A Bristol-born former actor and schoolteacher, Peter Nichols was born on July 31, 1927. He got his start writing some 14 plays for television and has continued to write for that medium even since attaining success in the West End. A Day in the Death of Joe Egg, his first stage play, was produced in England in 1967 and on Broadway a year later. Joe Egg (as a squeamish American management insisted it be retitled) concerns a couple whose marriage is slowly being destroyed by their attempt to raise a hopelessly spastic daughter (Josephine, alias Joe Egg, their "living parsnip"). They survive in their situation as long as they do only by ceaselessly joking about it.

This comic distancing, as much as its autobiographical revelation, was to be the common characteristic of Nichols's later plays. Forget-Me-Not-Lane (1971), distinctly personal in its middle-aged re-examination of a World War II childhood, has characters stepping back and forth through time and in and out of the dramatic situation. In Passion Play (1981), Nichols's characters even break away from themselves, each partner in a bickering couple splitting into mutually critical components. The National Health (1969), produced to general acclaim at the National Theatre, achieves its distancing through the alternation of realistic scenes of suffering and dying in a hospital ward with episodes of an outrageous medical soap opera, Nurse Norton's Affair, shown on a simulated television screen. And in the ironic musical episodes of Privates on Parade (1977), the story of an army entertainment troupe in the 1950s, Nichols entered the area of alienating theatricalism explored by John Osborne's The Entertainer (1957) and Joan Littlewood's Oh, What a Lovely War. Privates, a Royal Shakespeare Company hit of 1977, has been made into a film, as have Joe Egg and The National Health. (Nichols also wrote the screenplay for the 1966 film satire Georgy Girl.)

(Bowker Author Biography)


Google Preview