Cover image for Revolution
Title:
Revolution
Author:
Wiles, Deborah, author.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Scholastic Press, 2014.
Physical Description:
495 pages : illustrations, map ; 22 cm.
Summary:
It's 1964 in Greenwood, Mississippi, and Sunny's town is being invaded by people from up north who are coming to help people register to vote. Her personal life isn't much better, as a new stepmother, brother, and sister are crowding into her life, giving her little room to breathe.--From publisher description.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Middle School.

840 Lexile
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader 5.2

Accelerated Reader AR MG+ 5.2 16.0 166809.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 5.5 24 Quiz: 63498.
ISBN:
9780545106078

9780545106085
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Summary

Summary

It's 1964, and Sunny's town is being invaded. Or at least that's what the adults of Greenwood, Mississippi, are saying. All Sunny knows is that people from up north are coming to help people register to vote. They're calling it Freedom Summer.

Meanwhile, Sunny can't help but feel like her house is being invaded, too. She has a new stepmother, a new brother, and a new sister crowding her life, giving her little room to breathe. And things get even trickier when Sunny and her brother are caught sneaking into the local swimming pool--where they bump into a mystery boy whose life is going to become tangled up in theirs.

As she did in her groundbreaking documentary novel COUNTDOWN, award-winning author Deborah Wiles uses stories and images to tell the riveting story of a certain time and place--and of kids who, in a world where everyone is choosing sides, must figure out how to stand up for themselves and fight for what's right.


Author Notes

Deborah Wiles is the author of the picture book FREEDOM SUMMER and three novels: LOVE, RUBY LAVENDER; THE AURORA COUNTY ALL-STARS; and EACH LITTLE BIRD THAT SINGS, a National Book Award finalist. She has vivid memories of ducking and covering under her school desk during air raid drills at the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis. She also sang in the Glee Club, was a champion speller, and hated Field Day. Deborah lives in Atlanta, Georgia. You can visit her on the web at www.deborahwiles.com.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* In this second book in the Sixties Trilogy, the action shifts to Greenwood, Mississippi, and focuses on Freedom Summer and its effect on the town. Twelve-year-old Sunny has family problems that, at first, suppress anything going on in the wider world. Her mother has deserted her, her father has remarried, and his new wife, Annabelle, comes with a son, Gillette, who is a little older than Sunny; a young daughter; Annabelle's mother; and a dog. But events begin to shake the citizenry, including Sunny and Gillette, who spot an African American boy leaving the segregated pool at night. The boy, Ray, is a harbinger of what's to come as invaders from the North (including Jo Ellen, the older sister in Countdown, 2010) open a Freedom School, register blacks to vote, and try to integrate public venues. This push begets pull, and soon Greenwood is awash in protests, arrests, and bloody violence. Several voices narrate, but the story belongs to Ray and, mostly, Sunny, whose confusion, dismay, fear, and bravery will resonate strongly with readers. Occasionally the family issues threaten to overwhelm the engrossing scenes of a society-altering summer. For the most part, though, Wiles does an excellent job of entwining the two plot strands and seamlessly integrating her exhaustive research, which is detailed at the book's conclusion. She also grew up in the South and brings an insider's authenticity. As in Countdown, the outstanding period artwork, photographs, snippets of sayings, and songs interspersed throughout bring a troubled time close.--Cooper, Ilene Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

This second installment of Wiles's Sixties Trilogy begins during the Freedom Summer of 1964, when hundreds of college students and community organizers arrived to help Mississippi's disenfranchised black citizens overcome voting hurdles erected by local officials. Sunny Fairchild, 12, has seen newspaper stories about these "invaders" and feels an affinity: her household has been taken over by her father's new wife, her children, and her elderly mother. Still, Sunny plans a summer floating in the (whites only) municipal pool, listening to the Beatles, and finding adventures. A chance encounter with Raymond, a talented young black athlete, sets Sunny on a dangerous course, one that exposes the poisonous racism that has her small town on the verge of exploding. As in Countdown (2010), Wiles intersperses Sunny and Raymond's story with historic photos, excerpts from speeches and news stories, and song lyrics that add power and heft to the story. Though the novel is long, it's also accessible and moving, and it will open many eyes to the brutal, not-so-distant past out of which a new standard of fairness and equality arose. Ages 8-12. Agent: Steven Malk, Writers House. (May) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-In Wiles's second installment of the trilogy, readers are offered two alternate viewpoints from very different worlds within the same Greenwood, Mississippi town during the tumultuous Freedom Summer of 1964. Sunny, a 12-year-old white girl, is worried about reports of "invaders" descending upon the sleepy Southern enclave and causing trouble. Meanwhile, Raymond, a black boy from Baptist Town (known among the white citizens as "Colored Town"), is becoming increasingly aware of all the places (especially the public pool and Leflore's theater) he is barred from attending due to Jim Crow laws. As Sunny's worldview is suddenly expanded as she begins to learn more about the sinister underbelly of her seemingly perfect town, her story intersects with Raymond's. Among the cadre of brave young volunteers working to register black Mississippians to vote-a mix of white and black members of various civil rights associations-is Jo Ellen, the older sister from Countdown (Scholastic, 2010). As in the first book, song lyrics, biblical verses, photographs, speeches, essays, and other ephemera immerse readers in one of the most important-and dangerous-moments during the Civil Rights Movement. While Sunny's experiences receive a slightly deeper focus than Raymond's, readers are offered a window into each community and will see both characters change and grow over the course of the summer. Inclusion of primary source materials, including the text of a real and vile pamphlet created by KKK members, does not shy away from the reality and hurtful language used by bigots during this time period. For those looking to extend the story with a full-sensory experience, the author has compiled YouTube clips of each song referenced in the book on a Pinterest board (http://ow.ly/vBGTc). With elements of family drama and coming-of-age themes that mirror the larger sociopolitical backdrop, Revolution is a book that lingers long after the last page.-Kiera Parrott, School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.