Cover image for Winter is coming
Title:
Winter is coming
Author:
Johnston, Tony, 1942- , author.
Publication Information:
New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, [2014]

©2014
Physical Description:
34 unnumbered pages : colored illustrations ; 25 x 29 cm
Summary:
Each day, from September through November, brings glimpses of forest animals seeking food in preparation for the onset of winter, from a fox sniffing the last apple on the ground to a flock of wild turkeys that finds nothing.
General Note:
"A Paula Wiseman Book."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Elementary Grade

330 Lexile

AD 330 Lexile.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781442472518
Format :
Book

Available:*

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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

"A quiet, beautiful picture book to share." -- Booklist (starred review)

"This gentle, lyrical celebration of the natural world will reward similarly observant readers." -- Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

"A touching reminder about the beauty of the natural world." -- School Library Journal (starred review)

"With meditative language, Johnston offers a vivid sense of the changing seasons and of stillness. LaMarche quietly and sensitively portrays a child who's comfortable spending hours alone, working on her own projects and observing--a young naturalist." -- Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Witness the changing of a season through a watchful child's eyes in this story of nature and discovery from award-winning author Tony Johnston and New York Times Best Illustrated artist Jim La Marche.

Day after day, a girl goes to her favorite place in the woods and quietly watches from her tree house as the chipmunks, the doe, the rabbits prepare for the winter. As the temperature drops, sunset comes earlier and a new season begins. Silently she observes the world around her as it reveals its secrets. It takes time and patience to see the changes as, slowly but surely, winter comes.


Author Notes

Tony Johnston was born in Los Angeles, California on January 30, 1942. She received a B.A. in history and an M.A in education from Stanford University. Before becoming a full-time author, she worked as a fourth-grade teacher.

She has written over 70 books for children. Her titles include Amber on the Mountain, the Cowboy and the Black-Eyed Pea, Day of the Dead, the Ghost of Nicholas Greebe, the Sparky and Eddie series, and the Adventures of Mole and Troll. Her first adult novel was Any Small Goodness.

Her works have earned her several awards including a Children's Choice Award for Four Scary Stories and the Beatty Award in 2002 for Any Small Goodness.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* On a cold September day, a girl takes her binoculars, sketch pad, and pencils outdoors to draw the wildlife around her family's farm. She returns several times before late November, when the first snowflakes fall. Often observing from a platform in a tree, she sketches what she sees: a red fox, a bear with her cub, a lynx, a skunk family, woodpeckers, rabbits, chipmunks, a doe with two fawns, Canada geese, and wild turkeys. The geese are flying south, but the other animals are foraging for food as they prepare to winter in the woods and fields around the farm. Written from the girl's point of view, Johnston's text is plainspoken and natural sounding but poetic in effect, with graceful repetition: on most double-page spreads, the lines end with Winter is coming. Created with acrylics, colored pencils, and opaque inks, LaMarche's captivating illustrations convey the radiance of an autumn meadow, the girl's rapt attention to her surroundings, and the unique qualities of the animals she observes. Winter may be in the title, but this evocative picture book is best for reading aloud in the fall, when children can notice the subtle changes happening in their own outdoor spaces. A quiet, beautiful picture book to share.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

A dark-haired girl sits alone in the woods, observing the behavior of animals from a platform up in a tree. Each animal that ventures into the clearing is getting ready for winter's cold. Though the foliage glows, food is becoming harder to find: "The mother bear snuffles for food among the flaming leaves. The cub snuffles too. But no luck.... Winter is coming." The girl's narration makes it clear that her family possesses a store of knowledge about the natural world. About skunks, she says, "I can smell them before I see them. Not a bad smell; a real smell. My father says animals are true to themselves." In one of several spreads meticulously worked with feather-light strokes, LaMarche (A Single Pearl) looks down on both the skunks and the girl on her platform, doubling the sense of secret observation. Sketches of the skunks lie beside her. With meditative language, Johnston (The Cat with Seven Names) offers a vivid sense of the changing seasons and of stillness. LaMarche quietly and sensitively portrays a child who's comfortable spending hours alone, working on her own projects and observing-a young naturalist. Ages 4-8. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-An empty sketchbook, freshly sharpened pencils, and binoculars set the stage for this luminous story about the powerful magic of being still and experiencing the natural world. Sitting in her tree house, using all her senses to witness the changing season, a girl sketches a variety of Northern animals and notes their habits as they forage for food. The short journal entries combine poetry with pragmatism, resulting in spare, elegant observations about nature: "Dawn burns the sky./A flock of wild turkeys jostles by./They poke everyplace, muttering/food, food, food." Although the variety of animals that she sees within a single season is rather implausible, the respect she has for nature and the life cycle keep the text grounded: "I know animals/are best left alone./Maybe the deer will find enough food./Maybe not./ Soon they move on, nibbling." Gorgeous acrylic and colored pencil illustrations show the wonder that the girl feels and evoke the experience of witnessing the layers of the natural world slowly revealing themselves as apparent stillness becomes full of life-wind rustling leaves, birds chirping, and scurrying insects. This book unflinchingly faces the fact that the cold is coming, the lean season is approaching, and there are endings within the cycle of life. A touching reminder about the beauty of the natural world.-Anna Haase Krueger, Ramsey County Library, MN (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.