Cover image for What the shepherd saw
Title:
What the shepherd saw
Author:
Lagerlöf, Selma, 1858-1940., author.
Uniform Title:
Heilige nacht. English
Publication Information:
New York : North-South Books, 2014.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
General Note:
First published in Switzerland under the title Die Heilige Nacht.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780735841901
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Holiday
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Childrens Area-Holiday
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
Searching...
Searching...
J PIC BOOK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

This picture book edition of Selma Lagerlof's classic tale tells of a shepherd whose heart and life are forever changed when he meets a strange man who says: "Dear friends, help me! My wife has just given birth to a child, and I must make a fire to warm her and the little one." The shepherd is astonished by the actions of the stranger . . . when the dogs don't bite him, the sheep don't run, and the fire doesn't scorch him. And when the shepherd follows the stranger, he discovers the true spirit of Christmas.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-Swedish author Lagerlöf was the first woman to win the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1909 and is known today primarily for her children's book, The Wonderful Adventures of Nils. This Nativity story tells of a man who approaches a mean-spirited shepherd to ask for coals to warm his wife who has just given birth to a child. The shepherd wants to refuse, but he is amazed that his dogs do not attack the man and the sheep allow him to walk over their backs to reach the fire. Still, he throws his staff at him, but it misses. At last he allows the man to pick up the live coals in his bare hands and marvels that he is not burned. The shepherd follows the man to a rocky cave, and his eyes and heart are finally open to the miracle that has occurred there. Paintings in a subdued palette are suited to the wintry, nighttime setting. This sentimental story is probably most appropriate for a family or Sunday School read-aloud.-Virginia Walter, UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.