Cover image for Rebel yell the violence, passion, and redemption of Stonewall Jackson
Title:
Rebel yell the violence, passion, and redemption of Stonewall Jackson
Author:
Gwynne, S. C. (Samuel C.), 1953-
Edition:
Unabridged.
Publication Information:
[United States] : Simon & Schuster Audio, [2014]
Physical Description:
21 audio discs (26 hr.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
Civil War general Thomas 'Stonewall' Jackson became a great and tragic American hero. General Stonewall Jackson was like no one anyone had ever seen. In April of 1862 he was merely another Confederate general with only a single battle credential in an army fighting in what seemed to be a losing cause. By middle June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the Western World.
General Note:
Compact discs.

Duration: 26:00:00.
Language:
English
Genre:
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781442367357
Format :
Audiobook on CD

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Call Number
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East Aurora Library E467.1.J15 G85 2014C Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Frank E. Merriweather Library E467.1.J15 G85 2014C Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Summary

Summary

From the author of the mega-bestselling, prize-winning New York Times bestseller Empire of the Summer Moon comes a groundbreaking account of how Civil War general Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson became a great and tragic American hero.

General Stonewall Jackson was like no one anyone had ever seen. In April of 1862 he was merely another Confederate general with only a single battle credential in an army fighting in what seemed to be a losing cause. By middle June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the Western World. He had given the Confederate cause what it had recently lacked: hope. In four full-scale battles and six major skirmishes in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley, Jackson had taken an army that never numbered more than 17,000 men and often had far less, against more than 70,000 Union troops whose generals had been ordered specifically to destroy him. And he had humiliated them, in spite of their best efforts, sent the armies reeling backward in retreat. He had done it with the full knowledge that he and his army were alone in a Union-dominated wilderness and surrounded at all times. He had even beaten a trap designed by Lincoln himself to catch him.

How did he do this? Jackson marched his men at a pace unknown to soldiers of the era. He made flashing strikes in unexpected places, and assaults of hard and relentless fury. He struck from behind mountain ranges and out of steep passes. His use of terrain reminded observers of Hannibal and Napoleon. His exploits in the valley rank among the most spectacular military achievements of the 19th century. Considered one of our country's greatest military figures, a difficult genius cited as inspiration by such later figures as George Patton and Erwin Rommel, and a man whose brilliance at the art of war transcends the Civil War itself, Stonewall Jackson's legacy is both great and tragic in this compelling account, which demonstrates how, as much as any Confederate figure, Jackson embodies the romantic Southern notion of the virtuous lost cause.


Author Notes

S.C. Gwynne is a journalist who worked for Time and Texas Monthly. He has written several books including Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History and Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, and Redemption of Stonewall Jackson.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Dispensing with a chronological march through the life of Confederate General Thomas Jackson, Gwynne presents Jackson's eccentric personality in biographical episodes that he injects into the arc of Jackson's Civil War campaigns and battles. For example, the book covers the future hero's boyhood and his 1850s tenure at the Virginia Military Institute (a rich source of anecdotes of Jackson's oddities) after the 1861 Battle of Bull Run. Gwynne's technique succeeds, thanks to his spry prose and cogent insight, in revealing Jackson's character. Describing him as shy, serious, determined, and profoundly religious, Gwynne captures the stiff, asocial persona Jackson presented to the world. Yet Jackson did exhibit warmer traits in female company, evidenced by Gwynne' quotations of surviving letters, though those don't reveal his feelings about his estrangement from his Unionist sister, Laura. Better known is Jackson's inflexible attitude toward military duty and, most important to history, his tactical and strategic command of warfare. Showing Jackson's exploitation of speed and deception, Gwynne's vivid account of his Civil War run, which ended with his death in the 1863 Battle of Chancellorsville, is a riveting, cover-to-cover read for history buffs.--Taylor, Gilbert Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Journalist Gwynne follows his bestselling Empire of the Summer Moon with a stimulating study of Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson. Jackson today remains a figure of almost mythical proportions and embodies the more heroic elements of the Southern cause. Gwynne, in a primarily chronological narrative, reveals him to have been an early master of modern mobile warfare and a clear-eyed interpreter of what modern "pitiless war was all about." In 1861, Jackson was "part of that great undifferentiated mass of second-rate humanity who weren't going anywhere in life." But underneath his efflorescent eccentricities, he was "highly perceptive and exquisitely sensitive," as well as an "incisive and articulate observer." In the spring of 1862 those qualities shaped the brilliant Shenandoah Valley campaign that reinvigorated a stagnant Confederate war effort and established him as the "most famous military figure in the Western world." Exhaustion limited Jackson's contributions to the Peninsular Campaign, but from Second Bull Run through Antietam to his mortal wounding at Chancellorsville, his achievements and his legend grew. Gwynne tells Jackson's story without editorializing and readers are likely to agree that, without Jackson, Lee "would never again be quite so brilliant," while even in the North Jackson was considered, rather than a rebel, a "gentleman and... fundamentally an American." Maps and 16-page photo insert. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

On the eve of the Civil War, Thomas J. Jackson was a middling professor at the Virginia Military Institute. By June 1862, "Stonewall" Jackson was widely regarded as one of the Confederacy's greatest generals. Gwynne (Empire of the Summer Moon) explores Jackson's meteoric rise through the Confederate ranks via his military actions, most notably at First Manassas and during his legendary 1862 Shenandoah Valley campaign. Attention is also given to his failings, such as his inaction during much of Robert E. Lee's Seven Days campaign. Particularly noteworthy is the author's exploration of the manner in which Jackson's foibles, including his constant refusal to share critical information with subordinates, hindered his capacity as a leader. Gwynne also illustrates how Jackson's shortcomings were overshadowed by his audacity and brilliance in the heat of battle. To the Confederacy, his presence in the field fostered a feeling of invincibility, which is why his death by friendly fire proved so devastating to the South's war effort. VERDICT This popular history is recommended for all readers interested in the Civil War. Academic librarians should also strongly consider James I. Robertson's Stonewall Jackson and Peter Cozzens's Shenandoah 1862. John R. Burch, Campbellsville Univ. Lib., KY (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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