Cover image for Skraelings
Title:
Skraelings
Author:
Qitsualik-Tinsley, Rachel, 1953- , author.
Publication Information:
Toronto, Ontario : Inhabit Media, 2014.
Physical Description:
89 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Summary:
In this adventurous novel--set in the ancient Arctic, but narrated for modern readers by an inquisitive and entertaining contemporary narrator--a young, wandering Inuit hunter named Kannujaq happens upon a camp in grave peril. The inhabitants of the camp are Tunit, a race of ancient Inuit ancestors known for their shyness and meekness. The tranquility of this Tunit camp has been shaken by a group of murderous, pale, bearded strangers who have arrived on a huge boat shaped like a loon. Unbeknownst to Kannujaq, he has stumbled upon a battle between the Tunit and a group of Viking warriors! As the camp prepares to defend itself against the approaching newcomers, Kannujaq and a Tunit shaman boy named Siku discover that the Vikings may have motivations other than murder and warfare at the heart of their quest.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781927095546
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

In this adventurous novel--set in the ancient Arctic, but narrated for modern readers by an inquisitive and entertaining contemporary narrator--a young, wandering Inuit hunter named Kannujaq happens upon a camp in grave peril. The inhabitants of the camp are Tunit, a race of ancient Inuit ancestors known for their shyness and meekness. The tranquility of this Tunit camp has been shaken by a group of murderous, pale, bearded strangers who have arrived on a huge boat shaped like a loon.

Unbeknownst to Kannujaq, he has stumbled upon a battle between the Tunit and a group of Viking warriors!

As the camp prepares to defend itself against the approaching newcomers, Kannujaq and a Tunit shaman boy named Siku discover that the Vikings may have motivations other than murder and warfare at the heart of their quest.

This lush historical fiction is steeped in Inuit traditional knowledge and concepts of ancient Inuit magic. The unique time and place brought to life in this exciting novel will delight young fans of historical and fantastical fiction alike.


Author Notes


Rachel Qitsualik-Tinsley
Is of the people who call themselves Inuit. She grew up dogsledding across the Arctic, living in snow houses, and watching her father fight off polar bears. She worked for a long time to help other cultures understand her people. She's bursting with stories to tell. And no matter how many she's already told, she just can't tell enough. She eventually told so many stories that the Queen of England gave her a medal for it. For her, the Arctic is wise and alive. If you don't understand that, visit and find out for yourself!

Sean Qitsualik-Tinsley
Is from a mixed background. He tells a lot of stories, but he likes hearing them even better. He studies myths and folktales and fables from all around the world. When he can't get enough, he makes up his own! He even tells stories about things that might happen in the far future. That's how, one day, he got an award for writing science fiction. He loves nature and thinks the Arctic is the most beautiful place he's ever seen. So he tries to treasure it by writing about the Arctic's beauty in stories.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-Kannujaq's life revolves with the seasons, moving with his dog sled to follow the hunts that make life sustainable for the Inuit people. This nomadic lifestyle contrasts sharply with the villages of the Tuniit, who stay in one place in homes that cannot be moved. When Kannujaq comes upon a Tuniit village under siege by giant-men in enormous boats, he becomes drawn into their dispute and it changes his world forever. The authors, both scholars of Inuit language, history, and cosmology, have selected a singularly important and interesting time for Skraelings: the sunset of the ancient Dorset (Tuniit) culture and the dawn of contact and colonization for the Inuit. Told by a conversational third-person narrator, this novella captures the fear and wonder of the age. Heavy graphic illustrations further reinforce the gravity of the tale and an Inukittut pronunciation guide is included. Skraelings is a well-written, engaging introduction to the complex history of the peoples of the Arctic and their struggles for survival against the environment and each other.-Sara Saxton, Wasilla Public Library, Wasilla, AK (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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