Cover image for Cannon
Title:
Cannon
Author:
Wood, Wallace, artist.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First Fantagraphics Books edition.
Publication Information:
Seattle, WA : Fantagraphics Books, 2014.
Physical Description:
vii, 288 pages : illustrations ; 19 x 28 cm
Summary:
Collects the full run of the Cold War spy comics serial that was published between 1970 and 1973 in the military tabloid "Overseas Weekly."
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781606997024
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Meet John Cannon, the perfect agent and America's answer to James Bond - with an exploitation twist. Initially brainwashed to be 'the perfect assassin' for the Red forces, Cannon was eventually rescued and brainwashed (again) by the CIA until he had no emotions whatsoever. From 1970-1973, Cannon appeared in Overseas Weekly, a newspaper distributed exclusively to U.S. Military bases around the world. Uncensored by commercial editorial restrictions, Wood pulled out all the stops - producing a thrilling and salacious Cold War spy serial run amok with sex and violence.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

If Wood's fantastically deranged action-porn comic-whose title character is an emotionless, crewcut Manchurian Candidate who never saw a Commie he didn't kill or a woman he didn't ravage-were ever filmed, the producers would save a mint on the actresses' wardrobes (mostly just consisting of unbuttoned blouses and go-go boots), but they'd spend a lot on squibs and explosives. Wood took his own life in 1981 when faced with declining health and difficulties finding paying work, but today he's revered as a comics master. Cannon was published from 1970 to 1973 in the military tabloid Overseas Weekly. Readers will be hard pressed to find three or four consecutive pages here without a machine-gun massacre or gratuitous nudity. The crude politics in the banana republic settings and the offensive characters (e.g., Chinese dominatrix/sex toy Madame Toy) are torridly retrograde, to the point of self-parody. Wood's attempts to rope in popular trends fall flat (a killer hippie named Hanson), but the occasional aside to servicemen show a sly intent ("We never interfere with the internal affairs of another country. Oh yeah... I guess I forgot"). For those who admire Wood's Formula One pacing, cinematic framing, and he-man obsessions, this is a guilty-pleasure keepsake. (Mar.)? (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.