Cover image for
Author:
Magoon, Scott/ Verner, Adam (NRT)
Edition:
DVD ON ORDER
General Note:
THIS TITLE IS CURRENTLY ON ORDER
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781633791206
Format :
Book

On Order

Summary

Summary

He's big. He's funny. He's not real. Or IS he? This clever twist on 'The Boy Who Cried Wolf' is told from the point of view of an unexpected narrator and, through snappy text and lighthearted illustrations, demonstrates the value of telling the truth, the importance of establishing trust, and (of course!) the possibility that a beast you created to get attention can become a real-life friend.


Summary

A classic tale with a timeless message gets a hugely hilarious twist.--He's big. He's funny. He's not real. Or IS he? This clever twist on 'The Boy Who Cried Wolf' is told from the point of view of an unexpected narrator and, through snappy text and lighthearted illustrations, demonstrates the value of telling the truth, the importance of establishing trust, and (of course!) the possibility that a beast created can get attention and can become a real-life friend.


Author Notes

Scott Magoon has illustrated numerous children's books including Spoon by Amy Rosenthal Krouse; Ugly Fish by Kara LaReau; Hugo and Miles in I've Painted Everything, and The Luck of the Loch Ness Monster: A Tale of Picky Eating, by A.W. Flaherty.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

At first glance Ben seems to be a nice little boy with a bike and a dog, but his flaw is that he likes to tell stories. Soon his insistence that he sees Bigfoot begins to wear on his family and friends. He is not above bolstering the stories either for instance, digging footprints on the edge of the forest. Even his dog gets mad. Then (not unexpectedly, since he is also on the cover) Bigfoot appears. Bigfoot likes Ben and likes Ben's bike, which prompts Ben to scream, Bigfoot is stealing my bike! Alas, like his predecessor who cried wolf, no one comes to help and no one believes him. But the last page finds Ben (with camera in tow) heading into the forest, determined to get proof. The decision to let Bigfoot narrate adds a unique perspective, but it detracts from any surprise. What's good fun are the full-color Edward Gorey-like illustrations, with all the action happening in the foreground in front of a changing sky except when Bigfoot comes to fill the page. A neat twist on an old tale.--Cooper, Ilene Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Magoon retells "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" in a book whose suspenseful, funny pictures and surprise narrator trump its familiar plot. "This is the story of my friend Ben and how we first met," says an offstage speaker, referring to a brown-haired boy. Ben "liked to tell stories," and readers see him at a forest's edge, alleging Bigfoot sightings to his weary parents, unbelieving sister, and neighborhood friends. Ben's small dog acts as a barometer for Ben's fibs, its expression going from tetchy to angry and then jolted by the "crick!" of a twig in the woods. "I didn't normally talk to a Littlefoot," explains the now-visible narrator, a towering Sasquatch. Ben looks on in shock while his dog merrily joins the creature for a spin on Ben's bike. Magoon (Big Mean Mike) sets events some decades in the past, giving Ben an antique bike, vintage clothing, and old-fashioned camera and video equipment. While there's still an emphasis on the importance of being honest, it's clear that Magoon also sees value in Ben's perseverance and sense of showmanship. Ages 4-8. Agent: Rebecca Sherman, Writers House. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 1-Bigfoot narrates this story of Ben, a boy who "liked to tell stories...a lot." The cartoon youngster in striped pants lies to everyone in town that he's seen Bigfoot in the woods. They gather for a glimpse, but leave in annoyance. Having observed all this, comically round-eyed Bigfoot emerges to claim Ben's bike and dog, knowing no one will believe an accusation of theft. Ben is a "tenacious fellow," and, at book's end, he sets out for the woods with old-fashioned camera equipment to record proof. Luckily, his dog is back to pull the wagon of gear. Digitally rendered illustrations are done in mostly green hues. Bigfoot is charming and goofy-looking with his smiles and manners, asking if he can "borrow" Ben's bike, and the child's expressions are priceless.-Gay Lynn Van Vleck, Henrico County Library, Glen Allen, VA (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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