Cover image for Slap shot
Title:
Slap shot
Author:
Hill, George Roy, 1921-2002, film director.
Edition:
[Blu-ray + Digital Copy + UltraViolet version].
Publication Information:
[United States] : [publisher not identified], [2013?]

Universal City, CA : Universal Studios Home Entertainment, [2013]

©2013
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (123 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
A profane satire of the world of professional hockey. An over-the-hill player-coach gathers an oddball mixture of has-beens and young players and initiates them into using violence to win the game.
General Note:
Title from container.

"Remastered in high definition"

Originally produced as a motion picture in 1977.

Special features: Feature commentary with the Hanson brothers; Puck talk with the Hansons; The Hanson brothers' classic scenes; Theatrical trailer.
Language:
English

French

Spanish
Reading Level:
Rating: R; restricted.
Added Uniform Title:
Slap shot (Motion picture)

Slap shot (Motion picture). French.

Slap shot (Motion picture). Spanish.

Dubbed version of: Slap shot (Motion picture)
UPC:
025192184055
Format :
Blu-Ray

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Orchard Park Library BLURAY 2884 Adult Blu-ray Disc Audio Visual
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Summary

Summary

Paul Newman plays Reggie Dunlop, the coach of a pathetic minor-league American hockey team. His career at a standstill and his marriage in tatters, Dunlop has nothing to lose by taking on a new group of players who are one evolutionary step above Neanderthals. Only when the team begins winning does he decide to get behind these players, and to encourage the rest of the team to play as down-and-dirty as the newcomers. Straight-arrow team member Ned Braden (Michael Ontkean) resents this influx of gonzo talent, preferring to play clean. As the film's multitude of subplots play themselves out, Dunlop does his best to keep the outraged Braden on the team. Slap Shot is the sort of film for which the "R" rating was invented: Its nonstop barrage of profanity and its raunchy action sequences are of such intensity that the film will probably never be shown intact on commercial television. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi


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