Cover image for Pride and prejudice and zombies : the classic Regency romance -- now with ultraviolent zombie mayhem
Title:
Pride and prejudice and zombies : the classic Regency romance -- now with ultraviolent zombie mayhem
Author:
Grahame-Smith, Seth.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Deluxe heirloom edition
Publication Information:
Philadelphia : Quirk Books, 2009.
Physical Description:
359 pages : color illustrations ; 21 cm
Summary:
A mysterious plague has fallen upon the quiet English village of Meryton--and the dead are returning to life! Feisty heroine Elizabeth Bennet is determined to wipe out the zombie menace, but she's soon distracted by the arrival of the haughty and arrogant Mr. Darcy.
General Note:
Includes discussion questions.

"Now with 30% more zombies!"--back cover.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 8.0 18.0 135977.
ISBN:
9781594744518
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The  New York Times  best seller is now a major motion picture starring Lily James and Sam Riley, with Matt Smith, Charles Dance, and Lena Headey. 
 
This deluxe heirloom edition includes a new preface by coauthor Seth Grahame-Smith, thirteen oil painting illustrations by Roberto Parada, and a fascinating afterword by Dr. Allen Grove of Alfred University--plus 30 percent more zombies!

Complete with romance, heartbreak, swordfights, cannibalism, and thousands of rotting corpses,  Pride and Prejudice and Zombies  is an audacious retelling of English literature's most enduring novel. This expanded edition of the beloved Jane Austen novel featuring all-new scenes of bone-crunching zombie mayhem begins when a mysterious plague falls upon the quiet English village of Meryton--and the dead are returning to life! Feisty heroine Elizabeth Bennet is determined to wipe out the zombie menace, but she's soon distracted by the arrival of the haughty and arrogant Mr. Darcy. What ensues is a delightful comedy of manners with plenty of civilized sparring between the two young lovers--and even more violent sparring on the blood-soaked battlefield. It's the perfect read for literature lovers, zombie fans, and anyone who loves a reanimated Austen.


Author Notes

Seth Grahame-Smith is an author and a film and television writer/producer. His books include How to Survive a Horror Movie: All the Skills to Dodge the Kills, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, Unholy Night, and The Last American Vampire. In addition to adapting the screenplay for his novel Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, he also wrote Tim Burton's film Dark Shadows.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

This may be the most wacky by-product of the busy Jane Austen fan-fiction industry at least among the spin-offs and pastiches that have made it into print. In what's described as an expanded edition of Pride and Prejudice, 85 percent of the original text has been preserved but fused with  ultraviolent zombie mayhem. For more than 50 years, we learn, England has been overrun by zombies, prompting people like the Bennets to send their daughters away to China for training in the art of deadly combat, and prompting others, like Lady Catherine de Bourgh, to employ armies of ninjas. Added to the familiar plot turns that bring Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy together is the fact that both are highly skilled killers, gleefully slaying zombies on the way to their happy ending. Is nothing sacred? Well, no, and mash-ups using literary classics that are freely available on the Web may become a whole new genre. What's next? Wuthering Heights and Werewolves?--Quinn, Mary Ellen Copyright 2009 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

What could be more zeitgeisty than the popular Jane Austen and zombie mashup written by Seth Grahame-Smith? A graphic novelization of Grahame-Smith's creation, of course. Lee and Richards collaborate on a lively adaptation, which should appeal to edgier fans of 19th-century novels. The plot and language cleave closely to the basic outlines of Austen's beloved tale, with the major exception that the English countryside is overrun by zombies, and the Bennett sisters are trained warriors. Elizabeth still disdains then pines for Mr. Darcy; Mr. Bennett is still as sage as his wife is daft; and Mr. Wickham is still a charming but duplicitous con man. Lovers of the novel will delight at the clever ways in which the zombie interludes tweak the well-known elements of the tale, although the story will make little sense to those not familiar with Austen. Artist Richards unfortunately makes all the Bennett sisters look like Barbies, with Elizabeth's lips looking as if they were pumped full of silicone; there are also some unnecessary flashes of Elizabeth's garters and thigh-high stockings. But the action sequences are dynamic, the English manors are lovely, and the zombies appropriately gory. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

You'll either love or loathe the idea of this classic rewritten to include hordes of brain-seeking zombie "unmentionables" and a Shaolin-trained Elizabeth Bennett. It is silly, of course, and at times unnecessarily crude (Do we really need this many puns on the word balls?), but it's also a great deal of fun-particularly when Elizabeth dreams about beheading her wayward sister Lydia. Verdict: As Grahame-Smith has retained 85 percent of the original text, Austen aficionados may enjoy seeing the familiar story through this new lens. Fans of satirical zombie films and horror-comedies like Shaun of the Dead and Army of Darkness will enjoy it, too. Buzz is high for this publisher's breakout title, which includes ten discussion questions. Recommended for all popular fiction collections.-Karl G. Siewert, Tulsa City-Cty. Lib., OK (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Adult/High School-Austen's England is overrun with "unmentionables." Etiquette and polite society still reign, but they do become strained when, for example, the ball at Netherfield is interrupted by an attack on the household staff. In this parody, Grahame-Smith maintains the structure and language of the original while strategically inserting zombies into the story. The surprise is how little changes. Elizabeth Bennett is still known for her beauty and intelligence. Here, she is also known for her expertise in the "deadly arts," abilities that only make her a less-desirable marriage partner. There is the constant physical peril that echoes the menace underlying the original. In addition to a life of homeless spinsterhood, the sisters fear having their brains eaten, or being bitten and turned into zombies themselves (a fate to which one character does unfortunately fall prey). The unmentionables also magnify the satirical aspects of the story. A few key arguments, such as the final confrontation between Elizabeth and Lady Catherine, become all-out brawls to the death. (Lady Catherine is famous for her fighting skills and army of ninjas.) And of course Darcy is a renowned swordsman, known for his gentlemanly ferocity. The concept alone is worth a chuckle. The undead are popular at the moment, and teens will be attracted to this clever version of a frequently assigned classic. However, they should be prepared for a somewhat slow read. The author has not accelerated the pace or created suspense in this mashup.-Angela Carstensen, Convent of the Sacred Heart, New York City (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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