Cover image for Hug machine
Title:
Hug machine
Author:
Campbell, Scott, 1973- , author, illustrator.
Edition:
First Edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, [2014]
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm
Summary:
The hug machine is available to hug anyone, any time, whether they are square or long, spikey or soft.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Ages 4-8.
ISBN:
9781442459359
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Material Type
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Central Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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Audubon Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Grand Island Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Kenilworth Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Kenmore Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lake Shore Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Marilla Free Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Anna M. Reinstein Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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City of Tonawanda Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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West Seneca Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Hamburg Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Watch out world, here he comes! The Hug Machine!

Whether you are big, or small, or square, or long, or spikey, or soft, no one can resist his unbelievable hugs! HUG ACCOMPLISHED!

This endearing story encourages a warm, caring, and buoyantly affectionate approach to life. Everyone deserves a hug-and this book!


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

From the title page, where the tiny hug machine boosts his biceps for a long day of hugging, to the exuberant tirelessness with which he dispenses embraces, this noodle-armed little boy who loves hugs is irrepressibly charming. Campbell's big-eyed, overall-­sporting toddler in red boots will hug anything, and he is the best: No one can resist my unbelievable hugging. Grumpy neighbors, sad babies, mailboxes, trees, snakes, a giant whale, and even a porcupine are no match for the hug machine, particularly after he is refueled by pizza. In cartoony watercolors in muted, pinky tones on open white backgrounds, Campbell depicts the boy, who clearly takes hugging very seriously, clasping his long arms around bewildered, deadpan passersby until he collapses from exhaustion and receives a warm hug from his own mom. Though parents will likely want to dissuade their little ones from hugging total strangers let alone a porcupine or bear it's a silly concept delightfully rendered, and the hug machine's enthusiasm for friendliness is hard not to love.--Hunter, Sarah Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

A boy shows ample pride in his hugging prowess in this ode to spreading joy, the first book Campbell (If Dogs Run Free) has both written and illustrated. There's no one and nothing that the protagonist-clad in shorts, a striped polo, and red boots-won't hug. He's so confident about the power of his "irresistible" hugs to calm people down, cheer them up, or "make the biggest feel small. The smallest feel big," that he calls himself the Hug Machine. Spiky porcupine? No problem. The Hug Machine dons a facemask, oven mitts, and a pillow before going in for the squeeze. Super-huge whale? The Hug Machine slides down the whale's back and hugs in increments. After a long day of hug-giving, the Hug Machine "can hug no more" and is scooped up into his mother's arms. Campbell's simply outlined watercolors exude warmth, emotion, and sly humor, from the deadpan expressions of several surprised recipients of the Hug Machine's hugs to his own serenely closed eyes during each hug, which make it clear that he's giving each hug his utmost. Ages 4-8. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Much like cats, young children can be quite persnickety about whom they embrace and when. Not so with this story's protagonist, aka the Hug Machine. This boy takes it upon himself to calm and cheer everyone, and everything (rocks, trees), he encounters with a warm hug. He takes his work quite seriously and no challenge is too tough (a porcupine) or large (a whale) for him to wrap his arms around. It's a big, important job that requires frequent refueling (pizza) to keep his "hugging energy high," but he's up to the task. Finally, when he's about to collapse from exhaustion, he acquiesces to his mom's request and lets her hold the Hug Machine in her arms. Campbell's stylized watercolor cartoon art is the perfect foil for the straightforward text. The humor is deadpan and the illustrations, though quirky, are enormously appealing. The diminutive boy is depicted with large eyes and extra-long arms, so he's well prepared for his chosen mission. Absolutely irresistible.-Luann Toth, School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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