Cover image for Draw!
Title:
Draw!
Author:
Colón, Raúl.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2014.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Summary:
In this wordless picture book, a boy who is confined to his room fills his sketch pad with lions and elephants, then imagines himself on a safari.
General Note:
"A Paula Wiseman Book."
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781442494923
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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Audubon Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Clarence Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Clearfield Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Oversize
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Crane Branch Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Elma Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Hamburg Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Kenmore Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lake Shore Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Lancaster Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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North Park Branch Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Newstead Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Niagara Branch Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Orchard Park Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Anna M. Reinstein Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Based on his own childhood, beloved and award-winning artist Ra#65533;l Col#65533;n's wordless book is about the limitless nature of creativity and imagination.

A boy alone in his room.
Pencils.
Sketchbook in hand.
What would it be like to go on safari?
Imagine.
Draw...

A boy named Leonardo begins to imagine and then to draw a world afar--first a rhinoceros, and then he meets some monkeys, and he always has a friendly elephant at his side. Soon he finds himself in the jungle and carried away by the sheer power of his imagination, seeing the world through his own eyes and making friends along the way.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

A boy in bed, asthma inhaler within reach, sketchbook at his side, looking at a book about Africa, is not confined by the walls of his room. As he begins to draw, he takes a journey. The palette changes from subdued pen-and-ink with wash in the bedroom to vibrant hues textured with scratched-in lines that seem to pulse, capturing the landscape and animals of Africa. On this wordless art safari, based on Colon's own childhood imaginings, first up is the elephant. This fellow is so pleased with the boy's portrait of him that he then accompanies the boy on his hunt. They spot a zeal of zebras (one watches as the boy creates) and a pride of lions. A charging rhinoceros is calmed when shown a sketch of himself made just in the nick of time! Youngsters will pore over each spread in wonder, soaking up the details. Upon his return, the traveling artist shares his pictures with his classmates. A true celebration of where our imaginations can take us.--McDermott, Jeanne Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

In Colon's (Baseball Is...) wordless fantasy, a boy lies on his bed, his sketchbook on the floor; he's lost in a large book titled Africa. As he takes up his sketchbook and begins to draw, small full-color panels of himself setting off across the African veldt sail forth from his mind like thought balloons. On the next page, he's entered his fantasy fully; he's in the African grasslands, carrying his drawing supplies and waving to a nearby elephant. After obligingly allowing its portrait to be drawn, the elephant carries the boy to meet other animals who pose for him-zebras, giraffes, and hippos. A rhinoceros portrait ends in near-calamity; a gang of baboons draw the boy. After a tender goodbye to the elephant, another series of sunlit panels retreats into the boy's head as he returns to real life. Colon's visual signature is the use of finely combed lines to trace the contours of his figures, a technique that's at once delicate and sensuous. It's a strongly developed and executed account of a childhood fantasy, urging all young artists to dream and to draw. Ages 4-8. Agency: Morgan Gaynin Inc. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-Using watercolor and colored pencils, Colon has created a wordless book (based on his childhood) that speaks volumes. A boy, home for the day perhaps because of an illness, sits on his bed reading a book about Africa. He begins to draw. Five identical, intensely colored pictures of the boy with an easel, art supplies, and a pit helmet increase in size as readers begin this richly imagined day on a safari. He draws an elephant as an egret watches, and atop the elephant's back, the boy and bird find a herd of zebras. They pose for him as he sits on a stump. Giraffes thunder by, raising clouds of golden dust. The boy draws them, his body aslant as his eyes follow them. He draws a gorilla, who holds his helmet and shares his sandwich. He draws lions, a water buffalo, and a hippo before sighting a charging rhinoceros. Running with all his might, he barely escapes the rhino. Baboons retrieve his pencils, set up his easel, and draw him. They also eat his sandwiches as the day slides into evening. A spread poignantly captures the parting of boy and elephant. Eyes closed, he lays his head against his friend's side while the elephant's trunk gently caresses the boy's cheek. As six identical paintings decrease in size, the book returns to the boy's pale room, now strewn with drawings. The final scene shows the boy at school, holding the elephant's picture front and center. The pleasure the boy takes in making and sharing his art is palpable. Young artists will love this book, as will all children who know the joy of exploring their own imaginations. A must-have for every library.-Mary Jean Smith, formerly at Southside Elementary School, Lebanon, TN (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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