Cover image for Native memoirs from the War of 1812 : Black Hawk and William Apess
Title:
Native memoirs from the War of 1812 : Black Hawk and William Apess
Author:
Benn, Carl, 1953-
Publication Information:
Baltimore : The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014.
Physical Description:
xiv, 184 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
Summary:
"Native peoples played major roles in the War of 1812 as allies of both the United States and Great Britain, but few wrote about their conflict experiences. Two famously wrote down their stories: Black Hawk, the British-allied chief of the still-independent Sauks from the upper Mississippi, and American soldier William Apess, a Christian convert from the Pequots who lived on a reservation in Connecticut. Carl Benn explores the wartime passages of their autobiographies, in which they detail their decisions to take up arms, their experiences in the fighting, their broader lives within the context of native-newcomer relations, and their views on such critical issues as aboriginal independence." -- Publisher's description.
Language:
English
Contents:
BLACK HAWK (SAUK) -- Introduction to Black Hawk -- Crisis on the Upper Mississippi Frontier, 1803?-12 -- Joining the British on the Detroit Front, 1812-13 -- Return Home, Keokuk's Rise, and Private War, 1814-15 -- Campaigning on the Mississippi River, 1814 -- An End to Fighting, 1815-16 -- Black Hawk's Speeches, 1815-17 -- WILLIAM APESS (PEQUOT) -- Introduction to William Apess -- An Indentured Servant's Struggles, 1809-13 -- A Runaway Joins the Army, 1812-13 -- Campaigning on the Canadian Border, 1813-15 -- A Wandering Life, 1815-16 -- Another Version of William Apess's Autobiography, c. 1813-c. 1820.
Conference Subject:
ISBN:
9781421412184

9781421412191
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Anna M. Reinstein Library E359.9.I63 N38 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Native peoples played major roles in the War of 1812 as allies of both the United States and Great Britain, but few wrote about their conflict experiences. Two famously wrote down their stories: Black Hawk, the British-allied chief of the still-independent Sauks from the upper Mississippi, and American soldier William Apess, a Christian convert from the Pequots who lived on a reservation in Connecticut. Carl Benn explores the wartime passages of their autobiographies, in which they detail their decisions to take up arms, their experiences in the fighting, their broader lives within the context of native-newcomer relations, and their views on such critical issues as aboriginal independence.

Scholars, students, and general readers interested in indigenous and military history in the early American republic will appreciate these important memoirs, along with Benn's helpful introductions and annotations.


Author Notes

Carl Benn is a professor of history at Ryerson University in Toronto. His books include Mohawks on the Nile: Natives among the Canadian Voyagers in Egypt, 1884-85 , The War of 1812 , and The Iroquois in the War of 1812 .


Reviews 1

Choice Review

This relatively brief volume takes a specialized look at two Native American memoirs from the 1830s--specifically, their passages regarding the War of 1812. The two principals are Black Hawk, a war chief of the Sauk, an independent Native nation allied with the British, and William Apess, a converted Christian Pequot minister fighting in the US army. Together, their stories make for a uniquely complementary take on one of the lesser-known but highly significant conflicts in US history. Because the memoirs of these two men do not focus solely on the War of 1812, editor Benn (Ryerson Univ., Canada) has provided the invaluable service of sifting through them and arranging the wartime passages into a comprehensible and coherent narrative. He provides explanatory and contextual annotations to clarify events and passages from the autobiographies. The volume includes paintings, drawings, and extensive endnotes (over 40 page's worth). Although it has a useful index as well as a detailed chronology, there are no actual entries, cross-references, lists of further reading, or other characteristics of a typical scholarly work. Nevertheless, this is a highly useful resource for any library's history collection. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. M. P. Tosko University of Akron


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