Cover image for Molecules : the elements and the architecture of everything
Title:
Molecules : the elements and the architecture of everything
Author:
Gray, Theodore W.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, [2014]
Physical Description:
240 pages : color illustrations ; 27 x 27 cm
Summary:
"Everything physical is made up of the elements and the infinite variety of molecules they form when they combine with each other. In [this book], Gray takes the next step in the grand story that began with the periodic table in his best-selling book The Elements ... Here, he explores ... the most interesting, essential, useful, and beautiful of the millions of chemical structures that make up every material in the world"--Amazon.com.
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781579129712
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library QC173 .G65 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Eden Library QC173 .G65 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

In his highly anticipated sequel to The Elements , Theodore Gray demonstrates how the elements of the periodic table combine to form the molecules that make up our world.

Everything physical is made up of the elements and the infinite variety of molecules they form when they combine with each other. In Molecules , Theodore Gray takes the next step in the grand story that began with the periodic table in his best-selling book, The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe . Here, he explores through fascinating stories and trademark stunning photography the most interesting, essential, useful, and beautiful of the millions of chemical structures that make up every material in the world.

Gray begins with an explanation of how atoms bond to form molecules and compounds, as well as the difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. He then goes on to explore the vast array of materials molecules can create, including: soaps and solvents; goops and oils; rocks and ores; ropes and fibers; painkillers and dangerous drugs; sweeteners; perfumes and stink bombs; colors and pigments; and controversial compounds including asbestos, CFCs, and thimerosal.

Big, gorgeous photographs, as well as diagrams of the compounds and their chemical bonds, rendered with never before seen beauty, fill the pages and capture molecules in their various states.

As he did in The Elements , Gray shows us molecules as we've never seen them before. It's the perfect book for his loyal fans who've been eager for more and for anyone fascinated with the mysteries of the material world.



Author Notes

Theodore Gray is the author of The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe , Molecules: The Elements and the Architecture of Everything, Reactions, and Theodore Gray's Completely Mad Science: Experiments You Can Do At Home, But Probably Shouldn't . He is the creator of the bestselling iPad apps "Elements" and "Molecules," which have both been named "App of the Week" by Apple and have been featured in commercials and print advertisement for the iPad. He lives in Urbana, Illinois.
Nick Mann is the photographer of The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe and Molecules: The Elements and the Architecture of Everything . Aside from having photographed more elements, molecules, and reactions than probably anyone in the world, he is an accomplished landscape, sports, and event photographer. He also lives in Urbana, Illinois.


Reviews 2

Library Journal Review

Building on the success of his previous works, Gray (Wolfram Research; The Elements) introduces a coffee-table book that moves beyond elements and into molecules. Through photographs and illustrations, the author introduces us to many of the molecules that affect our everyday and not-so-everyday lives. While anyone can appreciate the impressive visuals in this book, others will be frustrated by Gray's prose style. The text is written at an uncomfortable intermediate level; some captions go into great or even excessive detail, while others are sparse at best. Readers with moderate to extensive knowledge of the subject will question many of Gray's descriptions and assertions, and those with little or no chemical education will be unable to understand other captions owing to their incomplete explanations. The focus is clearly on the photography, often to the extreme detriment of substance and coverage. VERDICT Readers who wish to learn more about chemistry would be better served with another work that isn't so strongly focused on photography. Those already familiar with the topic are sure to enjoy the images. John Kromer, Miami Univ. of Ohio Lib., Oxford, OH (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This wonderfully illustrated and informative book, used with the author's previous book, The Elements (CH, May'10, 47-5023), could serve as a "crash" but enjoyable introduction to chemistry, especially organic chemistry. Early on, Gray (popular science writer; cofounder, Wolfram Research) defines the terms compound, chemical, and organic and attempts to dispel all-too-common misconceptions about them and their misuse. Designations such as natural and artificial and the sources of chemicals should not really matter. All chemical compounds described are illustrated with chemical formula line drawings, photographs of the compounds or materials (often commercial) made from them, or both. In the introduction, Gray explains that the book's organization is more like going through a chemistry set (still available!) rather than a typical textbook. He describes more than a dozen classes of chemicals and materials, and facts and factoids abound. The book is a storehouse of information on "descriptive chemistry," the kind of information that attracts so many to chemistry (and is often lacking in chemistry texts), even those not destined to become chemists. Gray provides excellent material to combat "chemophobia." This reasonably priced work is useful for introductory chemistry courses, including precollege and "chemistry for poets," science education majors, and laypeople. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Undergraduate and secondary school students; general readers. --Robert Edward Buntrock, University of Maine


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