Cover image for Miscarriage, medicine & miracles : everything you need to know about miscarriage
Title:
Miscarriage, medicine & miracles : everything you need to know about miscarriage
Author:
Young, Bruce K., 1938-
Personal Author:
Edition:
Bantam trade paperback edition.
Publication Information:
New York, New York : Bantam Books, 2009.

©2008
Physical Description:
xvii, 334 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
Summary:
Overview: From one of the foremost doctors in the field and a journalist who has experienced multiple miscarriages herself comes an accessible, encouraging, and complete guide to both the causes and, more important, the prevention of miscarriage. Though one in four American women will lose her pregnancy, with the right pre-pregnancy evaluation and ongoing care, for many women miscarriage can be prevented. During forty years of practice, Dr. Bruce Young has treated hundreds of women who experienced this heartbreaking loss and helped them bring babies to term. Now he has teamed up with one of his patients, Amy Zavatto, to write this compassionate guide that combines medical facts with insights from both the patient's and doctor's viewpoints. Including real-life case studies, Dr. Young provides in-depth answers to the questions: Why did this happen to me? and What can I do to prevent it next time?
General Note:
Originally published in hardcover: 2008.

Includes index.
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction -- Basics: -- Preparing for pregnancy: understanding your body -- Nutrition and pregnancy: feeding the baby -- What is a miscarriage? -- Recurrent miscarriage: lightning strikes twice (or more) -- Diagnostic evaluation for miscarriage: what you can expect, step-by-step -- New technology for the new age -- Miscarriage myths -- Anatomy Is Not Destiny: -- Cervical insufficiency: competent woman, incompetent cervix -- Asherman Syndrome: scarred and scared -- Abnormal uterus: shaping up -- Ectopic pregnancy: misplaced trust -- Fibroids: unwanted guests -- Multiple pregnancy: less is more -- Malfunctions: Systems Failure: -- Severe maternal illness: blindsided -- Endocrine causes of miscarriage: yes, it's hormonal -- Diabetes: it's about control -- Inadequate corpus luteum: tired ovaries -- Blighted ovum: a bad start -- Auto-immune disease: when the body fights itself -- Blood-clotting disorders: too much of a good thing -- Environmental Hazards: When Nature Doesn't Nurture: -- Infections: germ invaders -- Toxic agents: greening your pregnancy -- Trauma: danger zones -- Stress, psychology, and pregnancy -- Understanding: -- Grieving, coping, hoping -- FAQ: your questions answered -- Glossary -- Index -- About the authors.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780553384857
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Kenmore Library RG648 .Y68 2009 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library RG648 .Y68 2009 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary


From one of the foremost doctors in the field and a journalist who has experienced multiple miscarriages herself comes an accessible, encouraging, and complete guide to both the causes and, more important, the prevention of miscarriage.

Though one in four American women will lose her pregnancy, with the right pre-pregnancy evaluation and ongoing care, for many women miscarriage can be prevented. During forty years of practice, Dr. Bruce Young has treated hundreds of women who experienced this heartbreaking loss and helped them bring babies to term. Now he has teamed up with one of his patients, Amy Zavatto, to write this compassionate guide that combines medical facts with insights from both the patient's and doctor's viewpoints. Including real-life case studies, Dr. Young provides in-depth answers to the questions: Why did this happen to me? and What can I do to prevent it next time?

Providing the most up-to-date information on physical and mental health, nutrition, and technology, here is a proactive tool and comforting resource--from an expert with real-life reasons to give every woman hope for a successful pregnancy.


Author Notes

Bruce Young, MD., is internationally known as a leader and innovator in obstetrics and gynecology. He developed the first obstetrical intensive care unit and founded the Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine at NYU Medical Center. He is the Silverman Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at NYU Medical School and is listed among America's Top Doctors and in New York magazine's Best Doctors 2008.

Amy Zavatto is a writer in New York City. Her work appears on Planned Parenthood's Teen Wire website, as well as in New York magazine, Food & Wine, and Plenty .


From the Hardcover edition.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Chapter One Preparing for Pregnancy: Understanding Your Body NEWLYWEDS DIANA AND GREG STARTED TO THINK ABOUT having children within the first year they tied the knot. Now 25, Diana had been my patient since she was a teenager. At her routine visit six months before, I congratulated her on her recent marriage and her new job as a fund-raiser for the university she'd attended as an undergrad. I suggested that she come in for a pre-pregnancy session and bring along her husband, Greg, an outgoing and friendly newspaper writer, to discuss pregnancy. When I met Diana ten years ago, her mother had brought her to my office. She was 15 and had been complaining of abdominal pain, which was getting worse and worse. At first, she told me, the pain came and went, although it was sometimes severe, but lately it was nearly continuous and she could not function at all. That day in my office she said the pain was across her lower abdomen and came in waves, but was constant and worse on the right side. It had gotten so bad it was affecting not just her after-school soccer, but her academic work as well. Understandably, both Diana and her mom were anxious about this frightening problem. I examined Diana and found her abdomen to be very tender. I did a sonogram, which showed me that she had an ovarian cyst, causing a twisted right ovary--immediate surgery was necessary to save her ovary. I performed laparoscopic surgery , removed the cyst, and was able to untwist the ovary and save it, preserving her fertility. laparoscopic surgery Considered a minimally invasive procedure, laparoscopic surgery is performed by making several small incisions in the abdomen, usually one-half to one centimeter in length. An incision is made through the navel (although the incision may also be made just below the navel, I like to make it through the navel so the scar can't be seen). A thin, long tube called a lap- aroscope is inserted through the incision into the patient. A camera is attached to the outside of the laparoscope, enabling the surgeon to see inside the patient by viewing an image on a TV screen transmitted by the camera. Tiny instruments are then inserted through secondary incisions to perform the surgery. Now, a decade later, Diana was ready to put that fertility to use. She and Greg were planning pregnancy in about four months, after she finished working on a particularly stressful fund-raiser for the university's capital endowment. I reviewed each of their medical histories and asked about their families to be sure that there were no hereditary problems or increased risk for miscarriage. I examined Diana again and confirmed that there were no new findings and that she remained physically well. There was no residual scarring from her previous surgery; in fact, there were no visible scars from the laparoscopic surgery. Her fertility was not affected and she was in great shape to get pregnant. Still, even with a clean bill of health there were some preliminary steps to be taken. I explained genetic screening to the couple and offered them our panel of blood tests for genetic diagnosis, best to be done at this time. I gave them my printed information for pregnant women, which contains answers to the most common questions and recommendations for nutrition and exercise, and describes normal changes in pregnancy. I began Diana on prenatal vitamins to be sure she had high levels in her body before she was pregnant. I explained the normal changes in pregnancy, what to expect, and what was not normal. I answered all the questions she and Greg had. Then I sent Diana for the standard blood tests for prenatal screening. All Diana's tests were normal. She and Greg followed my advice about stopping the birth control pill and switched to condoms until they were ready to try for pregnancy. Five months later, they conceived. The following nine mon Excerpted from Miscarriage, Medicine and Miracles: Everything You Need to Know about Miscarriage by Bruce Young, Amy Zavatto All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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