Cover image for Come back, little Sheba
Title:
Come back, little Sheba
Author:
Mann, Daniel, 1912-1991.
Publication Information:
Hollywood, Calif. : Paramount, [2004]
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (approximately 95 min.) : sound, black and white ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
Lola Delaney is a vulgar, dumpy, less-than-bright "shotgun bride" who is married to recovering alcoholic Doc Delaney. Their unhappy marriage is made even more unhappy when a sexy stranger, Marie, rents a room from Lola. Lola is a tiresome creature who never stops talking, especially about the "imminent" return of her runaway dog Sheba. Doc is having enough trouble staying from the bottle and resigning himself to his marriage without the curvaceous Marie arousing his baser instincts.
General Note:
Title from container.

Originally released as a motion picture in 1952.

Based on the original play by William Inge; produced on the stage by The Theatre Guild.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
MPAA rating: Not rated.
Added Corporate Author:
Added Uniform Title:
Come back, little Sheba (Motion picture : 1952)
ISBN:
9780792198048
UPC:
097360521344

883929312481

032429284594
Format :
DVD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clarence Library DVD 66101 Adult DVD New Materials
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Summary

Summary

In the original Broadway production of this William Inge play, Shirley Booth played Lola Delaney, the vulgar, dumpy, less-than-bright "shotgun bride" of recovering alcoholic Doc Delaney, played on stage by Sidney Blackmer, who won a Tony award for his efforts. When time came to film the play, Shirley Booth was retained as Lola, but Burt Lancaster replaced Blackmer as Doc. Although Lancaster seems far too youthful for the role, the film is a fascinating and sometimes funny study of an unhappy marriage made unhappier by the arrival of a sexy stranger. Young Marie (Terry Moore) rents a room from Lola, a tiresome creature who never stops talking, especially about the "imminent" return of her runaway dog Sheba. Doc is having enough trouble staying away from the bottle and resigning himself to his marriage without the curvaceous Marie arousing his baser instincts. The characters interact with gloomy consequences, in the typical kitchen-sink-realism style of Inge's Fifties plays, although a tacked-on happy ending, common to Fifties movie melodramas, pretends otherwise. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi


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