Cover image for Positive options for colorectal cancer : self-help and treatment
Title:
Positive options for colorectal cancer : self-help and treatment
Author:
Larson, Carol Ann.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Second edition.
Publication Information:
Alameda, CA : Hunter House Publishers, [2014]

©2014
Physical Description:
xiv, 162 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
Summary:
"Positive Options for Colorectal Cancer offers readers everything they need to know about understanding and dealing with colorectal cancer. It presents detailed information in a clear and concise manner from a well-known advocate and author who is a personal survivor of Stage III colorectal cancer for more than 20 years. Chapters present information on prevention techniques, warning signs, and screening tests including the latest on virtual colonoscopy and how to find and talk honestly with the right doctor. It offers tips on treatment options including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation in addition to advice for life after colorectal cancer and how to find support and resources for the colorectal cancer patient"--

"Colorectal cancer is preventable and treatable if caught in time, yet less than 40% of the population gets routinely screened for this disease. This is a disease no want wants to talk about or be tested for. POSITIVE OPTIONS FOR COLORECTAL CANCER breaks that silence. Written by one of the founding members of Advocates for Colorectal Education, (ACE, ) this book contains everything you need to know about this disease. The author openly answers the questions most people would like to know but feel uncomfortable asking, and she goes a long way toward taking the fear of the unknown out of treatment for colorectal cancer. Three doctors from the Minnesota Colon and Rectal Foundation, and professional nurses have checked the medical information, and members of ACE have added their expertise and more than 12 colorectal cancer survival stories to the book"--
Language:
English
Contents:
Facing the unknown -- Gathering information -- Working with medical professionals to develop a health plan -- Dealing with your feelings -- Coping with surgery : plain talk about a complicated subject -- The first six weeks after surgery -- The challenges of chemotherapy -- Possible complications after treatment -- Lessons learned from surviving cancer.
ISBN:
9780897936941
Format :
Book

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Central Library RC280.C6 L385 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Audubon Library RC280.C6 L385 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library RC280.C6 L385 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Eggertsville-Snyder Library RC280.C6 L385 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Anna M. Reinstein Library RC280.C6 L385 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library RC280.C6 L385 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Positive Options for Colorectal Cancer offers readers everything they need to know about understanding and dealing with colorectal cancer. It presents detailed information in a clear and concise manner from a well-known advocate and author who is a personal survivor of Stage III colorectal cancer for more than 20 years. Chapters present information on prevention techniques, warning signs, and screening tests including the latest on virtual colonoscopy and how to find and talk honestly with the right doctor. It offers tips on treatment options including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation in addition to advice for life after colorectal cancer and how to find support and resources for the colorectal cancer patient.


Author Notes

Carol Ann Larson, educator and health writer, was given the Breaking Boundaries Award in 2008 from Fight Colorectal Cancer. She is an ASG (Affiliated Support Group) board member of both the United Ostomy Associations of America and the Ostomy Association of the Minneapolis Area (OAMA). She lives in Minnetonka, Minnesota.
Kathleen Ogle, MD, was the medical oncologist at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Excerpt from Positive Options for Colorectal Cancer, Second Edition Foreword Many of you who have picked up this book have been diagnosed with colon or rectal cancer, know or love someone who has, or live in fear of it because of a family history of the illness. Some of you are interested in maintaining your health in whatever way you can. Others may simply be curious, looking for stories from a patient's point of view that are true and honest. If you fall into one of these groups, you have opened the right book. Colon and rectal cancer will affect an estimated 142,820 Americans in 2013, with slightly more cases occurring in women than in men. Fifty thousand men and women die of the disease every year, most having lived with their cancer for several years. Yet even in the face of these alarming statistics, a shroud of secrecy surrounds the illness. Despite our culture's ability to openly discuss many subjects once considered taboo, far too many of us feel that to speak of the intestine is somehow improper in polite company. Carol Larson and the cancer survivors who have contributed their stories to this book are courageous enough to ignore such rules. They face the secrecy head-on and stare it down. They help us to understand the disease and to laugh and cry along with them as they describe their very individual and difficult journeys. Carol's years as an educator serve her well in bringing these stories to us with skill, charm, insight, and humor. I have rarely known anyone who was able to describe with such perceptivity and intelligence her own experience undergoing cancer treatment. Carol and the other survivors' collective experiences--and a lot of very useful medical and scientific information--is presented in this book in a clear and readable fashion. As a medical oncologist, I have counseled hundreds of patients with colon and rectal cancer as they faced decisions and found their way through today's bewildering medical system. Perhaps more than is the case with most other cancers, up-to-date treatment of colorectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary ap¬proach, which means that many different types of medical doctors and professionals are involved at every step of the way. The team may require a general physician, a gastroenterologist, a general surgeon, a surgeon who specializes in colorectal diseases, a medical oncologist, a radiation oncologist, an enterostomal therapist, oncology nurses skilled in delivering chemotherapy, and radiation oncology technicians and nurses. Ms. Larson met with and interviewed professionals from all of these disciplines and more. Nowadays, with our wealth of online resources, it is easy to find factual information about illness and health. In addition to what can be found on the Internet, a flood of health-related information is available in nearly any hospital or library in the country. However, what is not so easy to come by is the wisdom to put it all together for others who need assistance. Positive Options for Colorectal Cancer describes a journey into hostile, foreign territory. It is territory I know well, and one through which I have tried to guide many others. A guidebook is always a useful item to pack on a journey, and here is one of the best. -Kathleen Ogle, M.D. Medical oncologist Introduction Positive Options for Colorectal Cancer is a book for patients, written by patients. It is loaded with practical tips from people who have experienced the problems firsthand. In the book we ask the following questions: What kinds of challenges does a person encounter when first diagnosed with colorectal cancer? What can help when going through invasive tests, negotiating with doctors, and dealing with unfamiliar equipment, drugs, and forms of treatment? How can a person cope with the depressing thoughts that accompany a life-threatening disease? How can people better communicate their needs during a crisis? Does radia­tion hurt? What things are helpful to consider before surgery? What can help you get through the experience of chemotherapy? What is an ostomy and, if you need one, how does it change your life? What happens to family life and sexuality when cancer strikes and afterward? What is it like to be a cancer survivor? The technical information contained in this book has been reviewed by the following: * doctors from Colon and Rectal Surgery Associates, Ltd. * oncologists from the Minnesota Oncology/Hematology Professional Association * Anna Leininger, M.S., genetic counselor from the Minnesota Colorectal Cancer Initiative * Jane Nielsen, oncology nurse and president of ACE * Vicki Haugen and Julie Powell, enterostomal nurses from Fairview Hospital, Minneapolis These health-care professionals were contacted to answer some of the questions we, as patients, wondered about but never asked our doctors when we went through the experience of living day and night with cancer. Some of the information contained in this book is new, such as the effectiveness of "virtual colonoscopy" and the newest findings on genetics and chemo­therapy. Progress in treating colorectal cancer will continue; new ways of looking at the disease will develop. What remains the same are the concerns of patients and their families as they find themselves encountering a diagnosis of colorectal cancer. This is a book for cancer patients, for people who love and care for those patients, and for people just seeking information. It is about exercising positive options to cope with colorectal cancer and to overcome difficulties, and it is about being transformed by the experience. Excerpted from Positive Options for Colorectal Cancer: Self-Help and Treatment by Carol Ann Larson All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Table of Contents

Kathleen Ogle, MD
Foreword...p. ix
Preface to the Second Editionp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
1 Facing the Unknownp. 5
What Is Colorectal Cancer?p. 5
Warning Signsp. 6
Paying Attention to Symptomsp. 7
Basic Screening Tests for Colorectal Cancerp. 10
Missed Signalsp. 14
Risk Factors for Colorectal Cancerp. 15
The Role of Stressp. 16
The Role of Geneticsp. 18
Positive Options for Facing the Unknownp. 21
2 Gathering Informationp. 23
Additional Tests for Colorectal Cancerp. 24
Stages of Colorectal Cancerp. 26
Adjusting to Test Resultsp. 27
Questions from Colorectal Cancer Patientsp. 29
Myths and Misinformationp. 31
Positive Options when Gathering Informationp. 34
3 Working with Medical Professionals to Develop a Health Planp. 35
Legal and Financial Concernsp. 36
Nurse Navigatorsp. 40
Managing Medical Recordsp. 41
Finding a Good Doctorp. 42
How to Get the Best Results when Working with Doctors and Nursesp. 44
Learning the Language of Medicine Landp. 47
What We Would Like to Say to Doctorsp. 47
Positive Options for Working with Medical Professionalsp. 48
4 Dealing with Your Feelingsp. 50
Coping with a Diagnosis of Cancerp. 50
Anger as a Catalystp. 51
Denial as a Form of Protectionp. 52
Bargaining for Timep. 55
Sorrow vs. Depressionp. 56
Finding the Right Support Groupp. 57
Grass-Roots Support Groupsp. 58
Expanding the Visionp. 61
Forming a New Self-Help Support Groupp. 63
How to Get What You Need from Othersp. 63
Keeping People Informedp. 65
Positive Options for Dealing with Your Feelingsp. 66
5 Making Decisions about Treatmentp. 67
Basic Information about Chemotherapyp. 68
An Oncologist Answers Questions about Chemotherapyp. 73
Basic Information about Radiation Therapyp. 74
My Experience with Radiation Therapyp. 78
Preparing for the Side Effects of Chemotherapy and Radiationp. 81
Questionable Treatmentsp. 83
Positive Options for Making Decisions about Treatmentp. 85
6 Coping with Surgery: Plain Talk about a Complicated Subjectp. 86
When Is Surgery Necessary?p. 86
Temporary Ostomiesp. 89
First Aid: The Enterostomal Nursesp. 89
Suggestions for Your Hospital Stayp. 91
What Should You Take to the Hospital?p. 93
The Operating Roomp. 95
The Recovery Roomp. 96
Positive Options for Coping with Surgeryp. 97
7 The First Six Weeks after Surgeryp. 98
What to Expect Once You're Homep. 98
Follow-Up to Surgeryp. 101
Special Problemsp. 101
Steps to Healing: Being Helped by Complementary Therapiesp. 103
Healing Versus Curingp. 106
Positive Options after Surgeryp. 110
8 The Challenges of Chemotherapyp. 111
Returning to Chemotherapyp. 111
Things That Helpp. 114
Dan's Storyp. 118
Positive Options for Going Through Chemotherapyp. 122
9 Possible Complications after Treatmentp. 123
Ileostomies, Colostomies, and Urostomiesp. 124
United Ostomy Associations of America (UOAA)p. 129
When a Temporary Ostomy Becomes Permanentp. 130
Visits to the Emergency Roomp. 134
Recurrences of Cancerp. 135
Positive Options for Dealing with Complications after Treatmentp. 137
10 Lessons Learned from Surviving Cancerp. 138
Begin with Realistic Expectationsp. 138
Learn When to Ask for Helpp. 139
Reduce Unnecessary Stressp. 140
Make a Comeback with Good Nutrition and Exercisep. 141
Expect to Encounter Some Potholes of Depressionp. 142
Remember to Laughp. 143
Explore the Private Roads of Sexualityp. 143
Advocate for Other Patientsp. 144
Beyond Cancerp. 147
Positive Options after Surviving Cancerp. 150
Referencesp. 151
Resourcesp. 152
Indexp. 158

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