Cover image for The new puberty : how to navigate early development in today's girls
Title:
The new puberty : how to navigate early development in today's girls
Author:
Greenspan, Louise, author.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
[Emmaus, Pennsylvania] : Rodale, [2014]
Physical Description:
xxvii, 244 pages ; 24 cm
Summary:
"The coming-of-age experience has changed dramatically, with girls maturing sooner than ever. But what happens when a girl has the body of a 13-year-old and the brain of an 8-year-old? Contrary to popular wisdom, early puberty is not merely a reflection of physical changes--it's deeply psychological, too, with effects that can put a girl at higher risk for behavioral problems and long-term health challenges, such as obesity, depression, eating disorders, and even cancer. [This book] is a ... guide for millions of parents--as well as teachers, coaches, pediatricians, and family members--by two notable experts in the field"--
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction: Welcome to the new puberty : is she entering puberty early? -- Pt. 1: The causes of early puberty. Move over, Judy Blume : how we define puberty today ; Going on 17 : the potential repercussions of early puberty ; Nature versus nurture : an in-depth look at puberty prompters -- Pt. 2: Strategies to help growing girls thrive. Is treatment necessary? : how to know when to medically intervene ; How to manage environmental risks : practicing the precautionary principle ; Lifestyle matters : establishing healthy habits ; "What is she thinking?" : inside the brain of a developing girl ; Don't have "the talk, " start the conversation : building emotional closeness.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781623363420
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

What happens when a girl has the brain of an 8-year-old and the body of a 13-year-old?

A sea change is underway among many of today's girls: They are developing faster and entering puberty earlier than ever before. Just a generation ago, fewer than 5 percent of girls started puberty before the age of 8; today that percentage has more than doubled. Early puberty is not just a matter of physical transformation--it's deeply psychological too, with effects that can put a girl at higher risk for behavioral problems as well as long-term health challenges such as obesity, depression,eating disorders, and even cancer.
Why is this happening, and what does it mean for our girls' futures? What can we do to help lead them through this major transition to live happy and healthy lives?
In their groundbreaking book, The New Puberty , Louise Greenspan, MD, and Julianna Deardorff, PhD--two leading experts on the root causes and potential consequences of early puberty in girls--have written a reassuring and empowering guide that will forever change the way we view puberty and parent the next generation.
Drawing on original cutting-edge research and years of clinical experience, Drs. Greenspan and Deardorff explain why girls are developing earlier and identify both established and surprising triggers--from excess body fat and hormone-mimicking chemicals to emotional stressors in a girl's home and family life. They offer highly practical strategies that can help prevent and manage early puberty, including how to limit exposures to certain ingredients in personal care and household products,which foods to eat and which to avoid, and ways to improve a child's sleep routine to promote healthy biology. Moreover, the authors--both mothers of young girls--offer parents, teachers, coaches, and caretakers guidance to initiate and continue the conversation about puberty in an age-appropriate way in order to support girls as they navigate this complex stage of their lives.
Impeccably researched, engaging, and urgently needed, The New Puberty provides a roadmap to help young girls move forward with confidence, ensuring their future well-being.


Author Notes

Louise Greenspan, MD, a board-certified endocrinologist focusing on puberty and an international leader in the field, works at Kaiser Permanente and is on faculty at UCSF.

Julianna Deardorff, PhD, is a clinical psychologist with a specialty in adolescence, and is on faculty at UC Berkeley. The authors' pioneering work on a recent early puberty study won them the 2013 Community Breast Cancer Research Award. They have contributed to Time magazine, Science , New York Times Magazine , and NPR. Both have young daughters and live in the San Francisco Bay Area.


Reviews 1

Publisher's Weekly Review

A growing number of young girls, some as young as seven-and-a-half years old, have been entering puberty early. This accessible volume from clinical psychologist Deardorff and pediatric endocrinologist Greenspan examines the phenomenon's causes and cases and offers strategies for girls and their parents to understand, manage, and possibly delay adverse physiological and psychological effects. Identifying three main "puberty prompters"-obesity, exposure to xenoestrogens and other chemicals that affect the hormone system, and social and psychological stressors-the authors suggest lifestyle changes including healthy nutrition, limited exposure to synthetic chemicals in household and beauty products, and the creation of a supportive family environment. They also discuss when medical intervention is appropriate and how to avoid future social and medical repercussions. While the media has, perhaps, sensationalized this topic, the good news is that while breast development, mood swings, body odor, and other signs of puberty may be evident in girls younger than in previous generations, the whole process now lasts longer, ending with menarche (the onset of menstruation) at an average age of 12 and a half. Urging parents not to "have the talk" with their daughters but rather to start an ongoing conversation as soon as possible, the authors share an abundance of action-based steps that should allay the fears of many panicked moms and dads and help girls to grow and thrive. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Table of Contents

Introduction: Welcome to the New Puberty: Is She Entering Puberty Early?p. xi
Part I The Causes of Early Puberty
Chapter 1 Move Over, Judy Blume: How We Define Puberty Todayp. 3
Chapter 2 7 Going on 17: The Potential Repercussions of Early Pubertyp. 25
Chapter 3 Nature versus Nurture: An In-Depth Look at Puberty Promptersp. 47
Part II Strategies to Help Growing Girls Thrive
Chapter 4 Is Treatment Necessary?: How to Know When to Medically Intervenep. 75
Chapter 5 How to Manage Environmental Risks: Practicing the Precautionary Principlep. 93
Chapter 6 Lifestyle Matters: Establishing Healthy Habitsp. 117
Chapter 7 "What Is She Thinking?": Inside the Brain of a Developingp. 155
Chapter 8 Don't Have "the Talk," Start the Conversation: Building Emotional Closenessp. 183
Acknowledgmentsp. 217
Selected Referencesp. 221
Recommended Reading and Additional Resourcesp. 231
Indexp. 239

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