Cover image for The Stratford Zoo Midnight Revue presents Macbeth
Title:
The Stratford Zoo Midnight Revue presents Macbeth
Author:
Lendler, Ian, author.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition 2014.
Publication Information:
New York : 01, First Second, 2014.
Physical Description:
74 pages : chiefly color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
"The Stratford Zoo looks like a normal zoo... until the gates shut at night. That's when the animals come out of their cages to stage elaborate performances of Shakespeare's greatest works. They might not be the most accomplished thespians, but they've got what counts: heart. Also fangs, feathers, scales, and tails" --
General Note:
Based on the play Macbeth.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781626721012

9781596439153
Format :
Book

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J FICTION Juvenile Graphic Novel Graphic Novels
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J FICTION Juvenile Graphic Novel Childrens Area
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J FICTION Juvenile Graphic Novel Graphic Novels
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J FICTION Juvenile Graphic Novel Graphic Novels
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Summary

Summary

The Stratford Zoo looks like a normal zoo... until the gates shut at night. That's when the animals come out of their cages to stage elaborate performances of Shakespeare's greatest works. They might not be the most accomplished thespians, but they've got what counts: heart. Also fangs, feathers, scales, and tails, in The Stratford Zoo Midnight Revue Presents Macbeth .
Ian Lendler's hilarious tale of after-hours animal stagecraft is perfectly paired with the adorable, accessible artwork of Zack Giallongo ( Broxo , Ewoks ). And with Romeo and Juliet coming in book two, this is a promising new series of graphic novels for young readers.


Author Notes

When Ian Lendler was younger, he really enjoyed acting in the theater. He was, however, extremely terrible at it. So he became a writer of children's books ( An Undone Fairy Tale and Saturday ) and non-fiction. But in order to support his family, he took a day job de-worming animals at the Stratford-on-Avon Zoo. He immediately recognized the talents of the troupe and began working with them on diction, dialect, and not eating the audience. When not working with his talented cast and crew, Ian sells lemonade on the sidewalk and plays the ukulele in San Rafael, CA.

Zack Giallongo is a professional cartoonist, cheese enthusiast, and amateur banjo-ist. Raised in the Northeast, he has a deep and instinctual love of apples, Fall, ancient gravestones, and old, crooked buildings. Although he loves all creatures great and small, his stint as an Illustration major at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth sent him down the path of comic craftsmanship rather than being a ranger or a zookeeper. His first solo graphic novel, Broxo is about teenage barbarians and was published in 2012. It hit #4 on the NYT Bestsellers list.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

At night, the animals at the Stratford Zoo go to the theater. While snacking on peanuts and carrion, the animal-family audience settles in for a production of the Scottish Play. The lion takes on the role of power-hungry, hubris-addled Macbeth, while the spotted cheetah (of course) plays his conniving wife. Their literal understanding of the term power-hungry means the copious use of ketchup is not just for prop blood, and a stork (not born of a mother) saves the day. All's well that ends well, and when daylight comes to the zoo, the animals are back to their usual lazy habits, except the peacock, who posts a flier about the next performance on the docket (Romeo and Juliet). An age-appropriate ending (everyone escapes Macbeth's expansive belly), along with the beautifully colorful panels and witty, entertaining tone, makes this a wonderfully accessible, engaging, and kid-friendly adaptation of the Shakespeare classic. The welcome hint at further installments in this wry and playful series means the Stratford Zoo Midnight Revue is a marquee to watch.--Goldsmith, Francisca Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Starred Review. One sign of promise is when an idea seems so obvious that it's a wonder it hasn't done before. A midnight zoo production of Macbeth, by animals for animals? Of course! The role of Macbeth goes to the lion, which means that he doesn't slay his enemies--he eats them. First to go is the king. Uh-oh--small animals are in the audience, and the action promises to be bloody. Fortunately, an elephant picks this moment to ease down the row, blocking much of the gore. Mom, what's all that red stuff? asks a young monkey. Uhhh... nothing, dear. Probably just ketchup. (She isn't wrong.) Lendler (An Undone Fairy Tale) provides the wordplay and one-liners, Giallongo (Broxo) the rubber-faced expressions and over-the-top silliness (when Macbeth sees a sign that he should go ahead and eat the king, it's a neon diner sign that shouts, Good Eats). Like any fine comic idea, once the structure is put into place, the laughs come effortlessly. This is the Bard at his broadest. Ages 7--10. Author's agent: Tanya McKinnon, McKinnon McIntyre. Illustrator's agent: Bernadette Baker-Baughman, Victoria Sanders and Associates. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-5-With its gruesome murders, Macbeth might not seem the most obvious of Shakespeare's plays to be adapted into a children's graphic novel, but by placing the play as a story within a story, Lender and Giallongo make it work. The animals of Stratford Zoo are putting on a show- specifically Macbeth -starring the lion as the play's titular hero and featuring a hyena and a cast of other animals to fill out the ranks. A sanitized version of the drama is told while the animal audience makes quips, provides commentary, and hides from the zookeeper. Naturally, a child-friendly, zoo animal-filled version of the tragic play wanders a great deal from the original. The additions and changes (such as Macbeth eating the king with copious amounts of ketchup) serve to make the tale and the entire graphic novel a comic affair that will appeal to younger readers. All of the violence is offstage and only hinted at, not depicted, in keeping with the younger audience envisioned for this book. The artwork is bright and cartoonish, with an appealing mix of panel sizes to keep the story moving, emphasize key points, and allow for amusing little details for readers to find. Perhaps the greatest missed opportunity is that only a few times do the animal thespians use lines from the original Shakespeare and these times are not marked as such. Other than that flaw, here is a delightful introduction to the Bard's work that won't overwhelm young readers.- Elizabeth Nicolai, Anchorage Public Library, AK (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.