Cover image for The very crowded sukkah
Title:
The very crowded sukkah
Author:
Kimmelman, Leslie, author.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Las Vegas, NV : Two Lions, [2013]

©2013
Physical Description:
28 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 21 x 26 cm
Summary:
"It's Sukkot, and Sam, Ava, Mom and Dad are building a sukkah, or little house, outdoors to celebrate the holiday. They can't wait to share their first meal inside. But -- pitterpatterpitterpatter -- it begins to rain. "Poor little sukkah, " says Ava. "All alone in the rain." But is it? It could be just the right shelter for some very surprising guests"--Front flap.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 2.4 0.5 162428.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781477817162
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Williamsville Library J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

It's Sukkot, and Sam, Ava, Mom, and Dad are building a sukkah, or little house, outdoors to celebrate the holiday. They can't wait to share their first meal inside. But--pitterpatterpitterpatter--it begins to rain. "Poor little sukkah," says Ava. "All alone in the rain." But is it? It may be just the right shelter for some very surprising guests.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

A family builds a sukkah in the backyard and then decorates it with chains and fall fruits and vegetables. But when the wind starts blowing and the lightning flashing, a plastic tarp is put over the roof, and the family watches from the house to see if it will withstand the storm. Young Ava says to her brother, Sam, Poor little sukkah. All alone in the rain. But is it? Turn the page and readers will see a ladybug and a butterfly inside. And ants and bunnies! When the rain stops, the creatures leave, the family returns, and Sukkoth dinner is served. That night the sukkah seems to be empty once more, but the final spread shows deer, a fox, a mouse, and even a skunk have come to enjoy the crumbs. Kids who celebrate this Jewish holiday will like the idea of the sukkah never really being empty. The seemingly computer-generated art is lively but a bit blurred in places, and some of the figures are awkwardly drawn. A final page explains more about the meaning of Sukkoth and how the harvest holiday is celebrated.--Cooper, Ilene Copyright 2010 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-Sam, Ava, Mom, and Dad build a sukkah in the backyard to celebrate Sukkot. A rainstorm delays their meal in the hut, but while the family is indoors, the booth shelters insects and wildlife. Sunshine returns, the family eats dinner in the sukkah, and animals return at nightfall to enjoy it. The characters are depicted as contemporary non-Orthodox Jews. The story itself assumes familiarity with the customs of the holiday, but an author's note provides more information. Sukkot tales are few and far between, but this one does little to fill the gap. The writing is weak and the digital chalk cartoons are uninspired. The internal logic of this story is shaky. It is unclear why a mixed crowd of wild and domestic predators and prey animals is attracted to the empty nighttime sukkah, or why this is the climax of the story. Buy only for large collections with a strong need of Sukkot stories.-Heidi Estrin, Congregation B'nai Israel, Boca Raton, FL (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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