Cover image for Freaking out : real-life stories about anxiety
Title:
Freaking out : real-life stories about anxiety
Author:
Wells, Mary Paul, author.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Toronto ; New York ; Vancouver : Annick Press, [2013]

©2013
Physical Description:
130 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Summary:
Presents thirteen true accounts of teenagers with varying levels of anxiety disorders, exploring how they addressed their anxiety and dealt with such issues as peer pressure, perfectionism, grief, and self-mutilation.
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction: Why am I freaking out? -- Heavy losses: After my father died, I developed an intense fear of losing everything -- Exiled: Ostracized, I was locked in thoughts of unworthiness, sure I'd never fit it -- The enemy next door: My unexplained fear of dogs was messing with my laid-back style -- Count me out: I had no idea why I was so afraid of numbers and concepts of space and time -- Stuck: Once I knew I had an anxiety disorder, I could finally get help -- Applause: My identity depended on being the center of attention -- (Dis)Comfort zone: Hiding my true self: that was how I coped with being different -- Changing course: When I couldn't get out of bed for days on end, I knew something had to change -- Nowhere to hide: You know the jitters you get before giving a speech? I always felt that way -- Nothing but the best: I had to learn that it was okay not to be good at everything -- Obsessions: Drug addiction didn't get rid of my anxiety; it made it worse -- The bathroom chronicles: My severe stomach pain was a clear sign that I had to find ways to chill out -- War story: Being separated from my family when I was just sixteen triggered years of chronic anxiety.
ISBN:
9781554515455

9781554515448
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
City of Tonawanda Library BF724.3.A57 F74 2013 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

That sweaty, gut-clenching, suffocating, racing-heart feeling ... ... That dull, never-ending sense that something's wrong. What is it? Anxiety. And it affects millions of young North Americans today. When anxiety has you in its grip, it can seem impossible to rationalize your way out of it. From phobias to compulsiveness to post traumatic stress disorder, Freaking Out chronicles the many guises of excessive anxiety in teens' lives and the havoc it can wreak.


Author Notes

Polly Wells is a writer and film producer. She lives in Toronto, Ontario, with her family.
Peter Mitchell is an award-winning illustrator whose work can be found in the L.A. Times and The Globe and Mail. He lives in Toronto with his family.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Written in first person but actually recast from single or composite interviews with teens or young adults, 13 narratives describe in detail a range of common circumstances and experiences that spark panic attacks or longer-term disturbances from fear of doing poorly on a test or being attacked by a dog to emotional fallout from being bullied or socially ostracized, losing a parent, escaping a war zone, being gay, or just becoming an adolescent. All of the interviewees have either cured themselves or at least begun to get past their afflictions. An afterword by a clinical psychologist summarizes anxiety's causes and explains what mental health professionals can do to help. The closing lists of print and web resources, organizations, and hotlines are generously sized. Along with the physical signs and effects of anxiety, and a number of potential coping strategies, readers will come away with clearer notions of anxiety's universality and, as the author puts it, when it's time to worry about being worried. --Peters, John Copyright 2010 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 7-10-In an introductory chapter, Wells describes the symptoms of anxiety and panic attacks and differentiates between fear and anxiety. She discusses the ways in which low levels of anxiety are a useful survival tactic. For example, if we worry about being hit by a car, we will remember to look before crossing the street. She also discusses why anxiety may plague teens, mentioning the combination of surging hormones, social changes at school as love enters into the mix of relationships, struggles with parents for more autonomy, and possible hereditary factors. The rest of the book consists of firsthand accounts from young people who struggled with anxiety and with obsessive compulsive disorder. They all discuss their history, identifying the causes of their problems and explaining the tools they used to cope with and overcome their anxiety. Seeking the help of a mentor, counselor, or therapist is recommended. Coping skills discussed include identifying triggers, changing thinking patterns, and learning relaxation techniques, and, in one case, the prescription of antidepressants provides the solution. Wells doesn't delve deeply into the full range of anxiety and panic disorders or offer a medical understanding. Teens suffering more extensively will need other resources but may be comforted by the stories of success offered here. An extensive list of resources is provided, including fiction and nonfiction books, websites and hotlines, and resources for parents. Line illustrations are unfortunately unappealing.-Nancy Silverrod, San Francisco Public Library (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Introduction: Why Am I Freaking Out?p. 1
Heavy Losses Celiap. 4
After my father died, I developed an intense fear of losing everything.
Exiled Alanap. 12
Ostracized, I was locked in thoughts of unworthiness, sure I'd never fit in
The Enemy Next Door Noahp. 22
My unexplained fear of dogs was messing with my laid-back style
Count Me Out Briony
I had no idea why I was so afraid of numbers and concepts of space and time
Stuck Gitap. 38
Once I knew I had an anxiety disorder, I could finally get help
Applause Benp. 48
My identity depended on being the center of attention
(Dis)Comfort Zone Neemap. 56
Hiding my true self: that was how I coped with being different
Changing Course Olliep. 66
When I couldn't get out of bed for days on end, I knew something had to change
Nowhere to Hide Carolinep. 74
You know the jitters you get before giving a speech? I always felt that way
Nothing but the Best Leilap. 84
I had to learn that it was okay not to be good at everything
Obsessions Stevenp. 92
Drug addiction didn't get rid of my anxiety; it made it worse
The Bathroom Chronicles Staceyp. 102
My severe stomach pain was a clear sign that I had to find ways to chill out
War Story Hamidp. 112
Being separated from my family when I was just sixteen triggered years of chronic anxiety.
Afterwordp. 123
Resourcesp. 126

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