Cover image for (In a sense) lost and found
Title:
(In a sense) lost and found
Author:
Muradov, Roman, author, artist.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
London : Nobrow Press, 2014.
Physical Description:
47 unnumbered unnumbered pages : chiefly color illustrations ; 25 cm
Summary:
The first graphic novel by rising star Roman Muradov explores the theme of innocence by treating it as a tangible object--something that can be used, lost, mistreated. Roman Muradov's crisp delicate style conjures a world of strange bookstores and absurd conspiracies.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781907704956
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

The first graphic novel by rising star Roman Muradov explores the theme of innocence by treating it as a tangible object--something that can be used, lost, mistreated. Roman Muradov's crisp delicate style conjures a world of strange bookstores and absurd conspiracies.



Author Notes

Roman Muradov was born in Moscow. He now resides in San Francisco, California. He hs worked for a large base of international clients as an illustrator, including Vogue, Random House, The New Yorker, The New York Times and Penguin. In 2013, Muradov recieved a Gold Medal from the Society of Illustrators. He lists Raymond Queneau, Chris Ware and Tove Jansson amongst his list of influences.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

In Muradov's debut graphic novel, innocence is a tangible thing, and F. Premise, a bespectacled young girl rendered in soft, loping lines and dusty colors, is missing hers. Without her innocence, F. is no longer welcome at home, so she wanders the streets and endures angry stares from passersby. A kindly bookstore owner offers her shelter and some somewhat helpful life advice, but F. is not content to take her missing innocence lying down. After following some clues, she discovers an underground world that traffics in lost innocence including her own. Muradov packs his panels with dark and dusky colors that fill loops and curlicues loosely suggesting shapes of people and places. When F. wanders the streets, crowds and cityscapes easily shift into overwhelming, nonsensical jumbles of color, imparting meaningful feeling to the sometimes disheveled images. Although it's hard to pin down precisely what innocence looks like or where F. is going, the unfair expectations for young women and her disorienting coming-of-age clearly filter through the sometimes opaque but always beautiful art.--Hunter, Sarah Copyright 2015 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

A highly regarded figure on the small-press comics scene, Muradov has been self-publishing his distinctive, off-beat comics for several years, most notably in The Yellow Zine. His strips combine a deeply melancholic philosophy with elaborate word play, all set off with his sublime art: blending rich manga-like flair with European crispness and clarity. Muradov's toned down his more confusing sensibilities for this debut graphic novel while retaining his playfulness and incisive wit. Heroine F. Premise awakes one morning to find her innocence has gone missing, much to her father's shame and to the horror of strangers, as she discovers after fleeing her home. Innocence here is depicted as a literal, tangible thing that can be seen by-or visually hidden from them-and the story examines the manner in which society labels and judges this quality. As Premise pursues the thieves who stole her innocence to a mysterious lair, she becomes more and more ensnared by a strangely mundane world, one in which she must decide what it means be innocent and what that might be worth. The art that takes center stage in the metaphorical narrative, in shapes and colors working together harmoniously to produce an utterly immersive beauty. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

"F. Premise awoke one morning from troubled dreams to find that her innocence had gone missing." At the breakfast table, her outraged father banishes her to her room. She escapes out the window, but people on the street stare at her. Seeking what's been lost, she befriends a fatalistic bookstore owner, sneaks into a "Fed-Hex" office where an underground collective of creature-headed beings make copies of her missing thing to sell to the masses, and finally comes to terms with her changed self. This slight-seeming parable grows wings through the craft of Muradov (Picnic Ruined). Meanings of near-real words such as fermions and eunuchwhats shimmer seductively just out of reach, while allusions to Franz Kafka, Arthur Schopenhauer, and the Zeus/Europa romance appear. His beautifully odd art extends the ambiguities, art deco swirls married to a Miro-like surrealistic simplicity and evocatively colored in a clean block style recalling Matisse's paper cutouts. The effect is a sort of visual jazz in tones orange through tan and brown. VERDICT This lovely magical-realist fable treats an intangible as tangible, a tangy-sad tweak for the imagination of teens and adults who appreciate quirky, dream-logic stories.-M.C. (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.