Cover image for Alexander, who's trying his best to be the best boy ever
Title:
Alexander, who's trying his best to be the best boy ever
Author:
Viorst, Judith., author.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York, New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, [2014]
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : illustrations (some color) ; 20 x 27 cm
Summary:
After eating an entire box of doughnuts leads to consequences Alexander does not like, he decides to be the best boy ever for the rest of his life.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Ages 4-8.

AD 1010 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 4.4 0.5 168780.
ISBN:
9781481423533
Format :
Book

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On Order

Summary

Summary

Alexander tries his hand at behaving in this hilarious companion to the bestselling classic Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day .

Last night somebody ate a whole box of jelly donuts. That somebody woke up with a terrible bellyache, and that somebody's mom found the empty box and told that somebody that there are going to be consequences.

That somebody is Alexander, and Alexander really hates consequences.

So from now on, he is going to try his best to be the Best Boy Ever. For the complete and entire rest of his life. Starting right this very minute.

But there are all sorts of things that you can't do when you're being the Best Boy Ever. Fun things. Very important things. Things that Alexander might-- just might--like a little bit more than he hates consequences.


Author Notes

Judith Viorst was born in Newark, New Jersey on February 2, 1931. She graduated from Rutgers University (1952) and the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute (1981).

She has written extensively, her works include children's books, collections of poetry, lyrics to musicals, several works of fiction, and a cookbook. She has won a Silver Pencil award (for The Tenth Good Thing About Barney) and an Emmy (for poems used in an Anne Bancroft TV special).

(Bowker Author Biography) Judith Viorst is the bestselling author of "Forever Fifty," "How Did I Get to Be Forty," "Necessary Losses," & several other works. She is also the author of the classic children's book "Alexander & the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day." A graduate of the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute, she is the recipient of various awards for her journalism & psychological writings. She lives in Washington, D.C., with her husband, political writer Milton Viorst. They have three sons.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Alexander, last seen in Alexander, Who's Not (Do You Hear Me? I Mean It!) Going to Move (1995), returns here with a bellyache. He has eaten an entire box of donuts, earning consequences from Mom. After spending the day alone in his room, he vows to avoid future punishment by becoming the best boy ever, and predictably his plan goes awry. It's really hard to be so quiet you don't wake everyone early Sunday morning; who knew your teacher would be annoyed when you volunteered to answer every question?; and Shelly's Music Shack might never be the same after you finish jumping around. Viorst's rumpled hero is more loquacious this time around, with his disgruntled point of view replaced by a slight awareness of how his actions affect others. Monés' crosshatch drawings (in the style of original illustrator Ray Cruz) feature a full-color halo-wearing Alexander and plenty of humor. Series fans will be relieved Alexander doesn't achieve total perfection here, leaving room, hopefully, for more adventures.--Weisman, Kay Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

After the consequences of eating an entire box of jelly doughnuts hit home, Viorst's iconic redheaded hero makes a big decision: "Starting this very minute," he tells his family, "I am being the best boy ever for the complete and entire rest of my life." In the week that follows, Saint Augustine has nothing on Alexander, who must refrain from bouncing his basketball indoors or dumping spaghetti on his brothers when they taunt him. What's more, he astutely observes, the world isn't exactly brimming with positive reinforcement: "Ms. Klimpt says I'm wearing her out and that she'll give me extra credit if only I would please stop raising my hand." Eventually, Alexander opts for the dark side, because, "the complete and entire rest of my life, I'm all of sudden thinking, is a long time." Working in the style of Ray Cruz, Mones falls a little short of his expressiveness and comic range, and Alexander looks almost prepubescent in many pages. But Viorst's Runyonesque ruminations on the nature of good and evil in a kid's world are as funny as ever. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Another winner about mischievous Alexander, who this time is trying to be the Best Boy Ever after his latest disastrous escapade: eating a whole box of doughnuts. "Consequences" follow-he has to stay in his room all day on Saturday, with no electronics or TV, and he suffers a ferocious stomachache for his greediness. After an exhausting seven days of striving mightily to be the BBE (with varying results), he wakes up on Saturday, doubting that he can continue his angelic behavior forever and succumbs to another box of doughnuts. The illustrations follow original artist Roy Cruz's art perfectly, humorously portraying Alexander's struggles with his worst self. Viorst's text is right on target as usual, hilariously describing the boy's thoughts: "I'm thinking how much I love eating jelly doughnuts. And I'm thinking how much I hate having consequences. And I'm thinking I hate those consequences much, much, much, much more than I love doughnuts." On Sunday he thinks, "Everyone's still asleep, and I'm still walking around on tiptoes. But it's lonesome..And I'm thinking that if I went out the front door and rang the doorbell five, six, seven times, no one would be sleeping anymore." Kids will surely identify with Alexander's trials and tribulations-either in a group situation or at home with a long-suffering parent, who will probably get a kick out of the book, too!-Judith Constantinides, formerly at East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library, LA (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.