Cover image for The terrorist's son : a story of choice
Title:
The terrorist's son : a story of choice
Author:
Ebrahim, Zak, 1983- , author.
Edition:
First TED Books hardcover edition.
Publication Information:
New York : TED Books, Simon & Schuster, Inc., 2014.

©2014
Physical Description:
96 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 19 cm
Summary:
"What is it like to grow up with a terrorist in your home? Zak Ebrahim was only seven years old when, on November 5th, 1990, his father El-Sayed Nosair shot and killed the leader of the Jewish Defense League. While in prison, Nosair helped plan the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993. In one of his infamous video messages, Osama bin Laden urged the world to "Remember El-Sayed Nosair." In The Terrorist's Son, Ebrahim dispels the myth that terrorism is a foregone conclusion for people trained to hate. Based on his own remarkable journey, he shows that hate is always a choice and so is tolerance. Though Ebrahim was subjected to a violent, intolerant ideology throughout his childhood, he did not become radicalized. Terrorist groups tap into certain vulnerabilities that are usually circumstantial poverty, oppression, disenfranchisement, lack of resources and options. Ebrahim shows how those same vulnerabilities can create great strengths, leading people to form great reserves of empathy and tolerance. He believes that, because we all have a deep capacity for empathy, humans have the choice-and can find the will-to reject negative ideology."--Provided by publisher.
General Note:
"A TED Original"--Dust jacket.

"Zak Ebrahim, author of The Terrorist's Son, " spoke at the TED Conference in 2014. His 9-minute talk, available for free at TED.com, was the inspiration for The Terrorist's Son."--page [98].
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781476784809
Format :
Book

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HV6430.E35 A3 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Biography
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HV6430.E35 A3 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

An extraordinary story, never before told: The intimate, behind-the-scenes life of an American boy raised by his terrorist father--the man who planned the 1993 World Trade Center bombing.

What is it like to grow up with a terrorist in your home? Zak Ebrahim was only seven years old when, on November 5th, 1990, his father El-Sayyid Nosair shot and killed the leader of the Jewish Defense League. While in prison, Nosair helped plan the bombing of the World Trade Center in 1993. In one of his infamous video messages, Osama bin Laden urged the world to "Remember El-Sayyid Nosair."

For Zak Ebrahim, a childhood amongst terrorism was all he knew. After his father's incarceration, his family moved often, and as the perpetual new kid in class, he faced constant teasing and exclusion. Yet, though his radicalized father and uncles modeled fanatical beliefs, to Ebrahim something never felt right. To the shy, awkward boy, something about the hateful feelings just felt unnatural.

In this book, Ebrahim dispels the myth that terrorism is a foregone conclusion for people trained to hate. Based on his own remarkable journey, he shows that hate is always a choice--but so is tolerance. Though Ebrahim was subjected to a violent, intolerant ideology throughout his childhood, he did not become radicalized. Ebrahim argues that people conditioned to be terrorists are actually well positioned to combat terrorism, because of their ability to bring seemingly incompatible ideologies together in conversation and advocate in the fight for peace. Ebrahim argues that everyone, regardless of their upbringing or circumstances, can learn to tap into their inherent empathy and embrace tolerance over hatred. His original, urgent message is fresh, groundbreaking, and essential to the current discussion about terrorism.


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Ebrahim had every reason to embrace that destructive union of intolerance and aggression known as terrorism. Only seven years old when his father, El-Sayyid Nosair, murdered the leader of the Jewish Defense League, Ebrahim grew up exposed daily to distorted Islamic preachments and had to contend with American public school bullies and other challenges. Instead of following a stereotypical path, Ebrahim has chosen a life of tolerance and advocates for children impacted by hate-filled adults. It's a book of modest length yet of transporting ambition: that those who transcend their turbulent past are uniquely poised to offer a message of hope. Verdict Ebrahim's quietly vulnerable reading lends an emotional charge to this necessary work. Recommended.-Kelly Sinclair, Temple P.L., TX (c) Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Chapter 1 November 5, 1990. Cliffside Park, New Jerseyp. 1
Chapter 2 Present Dayp. 12
Chapter 3 1981. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvaniap. 17
Chapter 4 1986. Jersey City, New Jerseyp. 28
Chapter 5 January 1991. Rikers Island Correctional Facility, New Yorkp. 38
Chapter 6 December 21, 1991. New York Supreme Court, Manhattanp. 47
Chapter 7 February 26, 1993. Jersey City, New Jerseyp. 54
Chapter 8 April 1996. Memphis, Tennesseep. 62
Chapter 9 December 1998. Alexandria, Egyptp. 72
Chapter 10 July 1999. Philadelphia, Pennsylvaniap. 76
Chapter 11 Epiloguep. 88