Cover image for Honeyky Hanukah
Title:
Honeyky Hanukah
Author:
Guthrie, Woody, 1912-1967, lyricist, composer.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Doubleday Books for Young Readers, [2014]
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 x 27 cm
Summary:
A family celebrates Hanukkah with latkes, hugs, kisses, and dancing.
Language:
English
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9780385379267

9780375973390
Format :
Book

Available:*

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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Childrens Area-Holiday
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Holiday
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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Summary

Summary

Latkes and goody things all over town,
It's Honeyky Hanukah time.

In Woody Guthrie's rowdy, funny celebration of a Hanukah night, a young boy and his dog move merrily from house to house, gathering up family and friends for a big feast at Bubbe's. Sing along with the accompanying CD, featuring Guthrie's song recorded by The Klezmatics.


Author Notes

Woody Guthrie (1912-1967) was a legendary American folk singer-songwriter. His songs told the stories of the American people- their land, their labors, their trials and their joys. While many of his songs were born of his experience in the Dust Bowl during the Great Depression, "Honeyky Hanukkah" was part of a little-known series of songs he wrote celebrating Jewish culture, inspired by his mother in law, Aliza Greenblatt, a well-known Yiddish poet who lived across the street from him during his years in Coney Island, New York.

Dave Horowitz is the illustrator of numerous picture books, including Five Little Gefiltes, a Sydney Taylor Notable Book for Young Readers in 2008 and selection of the PJ Library.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

When you think of Woody Guthrie songs, one about Hanukkah probably isn't the first subject that comes to mind. But as the informative note explains, Guthrie wrote a number of Jewish songs that were born out of his strong relationship with his mother-in-law, a Yiddish poet. The lyrics for Honeyky Hanukah (a nontraditional spelling of the holiday) may not be particularly unique (Latkes and goody things all over town), but as the accompanying CD by the Klezmatics shows, it's a happy tune for a festive time. Horowitz's artwork, created with construction paper, charcoal, and colored pencils, is simple, sturdy, and adds to the fun.--Cooper, Ilene Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

This selection from Guthrie's Jewish-themed oeuvre-inspired by his mother-in-law, the Jewish poet Aliza Greenblatt-has a novelty song refrain that inspires a toe-tapping performance (on the accompanying CD) by the Grammy-winning and always irresistible Klezmatics. Ever the populist, Guthrie reminds readers that Hanukkah is not all treats and presents: "If you've got no money, well, that's all right... Your kiss is nicer than cakes from the store/ It's Honeyky Hanukah time." Created with cut paper, charcoal, and colored pencils, Horowitz's (Twenty-Six Pirates: An Alphabet Book) illustrations have a slightly smaller quotient of his customary goofiness, but they're bouncy and bright, and ably serve as illustrated title cards to get readers in a singalong mood. A bookplate-slash-gift tag on the front endpaper encourages giving. Ages 3-7. (Sept.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-A whimsical spread accompanies each of the seven verses of Guthrie's song in this celebration featuring a curly-haired youngster who, with his enthusiastic dog, happily devours Bubbie's fresh-baked treats and then proceeds to play guitar on an urban stoop and sing the praises of Hanukkah. Mention is made of the candles burning for a week, but though repeatedly pictured, the menorah is never named in the text. Nor is the dreidel, shown spinning as a pig-tailed girl romps with the dog while another boy discovers a present. In following pages, the children parade (with dog in tow) to deliver presents to Mom and Dad, share hugs, expand on the music-making, and dance a rooftop hora with Bubbie and Zayde. The construction paper, charcoal, and colored-pencil illustrations capture the spirit conveyed by Guthrie's exuberant musings. Background on the musician and the impetus for his Jewish songs are appended. A CD of the Klezmatics performing a rousing version of the song is included.-Linda Israelson, Los Angeles Public Library (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.