Cover image for The gigantic beard that was evil
Title:
The gigantic beard that was evil
Author:
Collins, Stephen, 1980-
Personal Author:
Edition:
1st U.S. ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Picador, 2014.

©2013
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : chiefly illustrations ; 23 cm
Summary:
"On the island of Here, livin's easy. Conduct is orderly. Lawns are neat. Citizens are clean shaven--and Dave is the most fastidious of them all. Dave is bald, but for a single hair. He loves drawing, his desk job, and the Bangles. But on one fateful day, his life is upended...by an unstoppable (yet pretty impressive) beard" --
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781250050397
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

NOW A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

The job of the skin is to keep it all in...

On the island of Here, livin's easy. Conduct is orderly. Lawns are neat. Citizens are clean shaven-and Dave is the most fastidious of them all. Dave is bald, but for a single hair. He loves drawing, his desk job, and the Bangles. But on one fateful day, his life is upended...by an unstoppable (yet pretty impressive) beard.

An off-beat fable worthy of Roald Dahl and Tim Burton, Stephen Collins' The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil is a darkly funny meditation on life, death, and what it means to be different--and a timeless ode to the art of beard maintenance.


Author Notes

Stephen Collins was born in 1980 and grew up in south London. He began cartooning in 2003, and has since won several awards, including the Jonathan Cape/Observer Graphic Short Story Prize and the inaugural 9th Art Award. His work has appeared in many publications worldwide, including Wired , GQ , and the BBC, and he contributes regular comics to the Guardian Weekend and Prospect magazine. He lives near Hertford with his wife and a well-charged beard trimmer.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Here is an oval of land in the midst of a sea, across which, though no one on Here can see it, is There. A fisher's son once set out in a rowboat for There, it's said, and never returned; it's also said that once There, he became untidy left hand mixed up with right, insides with outsides, and so forth. Here is an exceedingly tidy place. It is exceedingly upsetting, then, when Dave, hitherto hairless save for a single curl beneath his left nostril, sprouts a beard that grows extraordinarily fast and, after a while, resists all cutting. Eventually, all Here's hairdressers are conscripted to manage it, and towers of scaffolding erected to keep it from engulfing the land. The beard is eventually dealt with, but Here is never quite tidy again, and that's all right. British cartoonist Collins' fable against conformity and xenophobia may strike Americans as mild (it's familiar territory for anyone who grew up on Dr. Seuss), but there's no denying the charm of his Gorey-like drawing style and whimsical story.--Olson, Ray Copyright 2014 Booklist


Library Journal Review

The "gigantic beard that was evil" consumes both the front and back covers of Collins's graphic novel. Consequently, the sense of dread and anticipation is palpable from the second you open the book. This is the mysterious and often wryly funny story of Dave, who lives on the Island of Here, a place of order, calm, and crushing boredom. There is a constant lurking threat of disorder coming from the outside world, from the dreaded There. One day, Dave unwittingly starts growing some major facial hair. He cuts it-but it grows back. It grows out of his window, through the yard, and threatens to consume the island. The solutions conceived to combat the beard are innovative, creative, and a bit out There. The effects of the beard, for Dave, for the people of Here, and for society are at odds-the book is more a tale of society's viselike grip on its members than an examination of nonconformity. But it's not as heavy as all that-it's told in light, flowing verse, with precise yet soft illustrations reminiscent of Raymond Briggs. Verdict A visually lyrical modern fable that manages to be both utterly unique and eerily recognizable.-Emilia Packard, Austin, TX (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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