Cover image for The problem with not being scared of monsters
Title:
The problem with not being scared of monsters
Author:
Richards, Dan, 1966- , author.
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
Honesdale, Pennsylvania : Boyds Mills Press, an imprint of Highlights, [2014]
Physical Description:
29 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
Who knew there was a problem with not being scared of monsters? The hero of this story knows it--all too well. Because he's not scared, the monsters think he's one of them. And now, they're way too friendly. They want to share everything! Which is, of course, a disaster. Good thing there's a terrified little brother to come to the rescue. With an understated text and hilarious illustrations, this picture book will have kids laughing away their fears.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
4-8.

P-3.

300 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.7 0.5 167855.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781620910245
Format :
Book

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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

Who knew there was a problem with not being scared of monsters? The hero of this story knows it--all too well. Because he's not scared, the monsters think he's one of them. And now, they're way too friendly. They want to share everything! Which is, of course, a disaster. Good thing there's a terrified little brother to come to the rescue. With an understated text and hilarious illustrations, this picture book will have kids laughing away their fears.


Author Notes

Dan Richards has been interested in monsters since he was old enough to check under his bed. He's been checking ever since and has found many of his closest friends that way. The Problem with Not Being Scared of Monsters is his first picture book. He lives with his family in Bothell, Washington. danrichardsbooks.com.

Robert Neubecker is a regular contributor to many national media publications, including the New York Times , Slate , and the Wall Street Journal . He is the award winning author-illustrator of Wow! City! ; Wow! America! ; and Wow! School! and has also illustrated many picture books, including Time Out for Monsters by Jeane Reidy and I Got Two Dogs by John Lithgow. He lives in Park City, Utah with his family, dogs, cats, and lizards. neubecker.com.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

As the young narrator of this lighthearted lament shows and tells us, the basic problem with not fearing monsters is the amount of mischief these creatures can wrangle a kid into. Food fights, lost homework, and dawdling can all be explained by the bouncy herd of monsters some with octopus-like tentacles, others with furry bodies and large jaws, and one that looks remarkably like one of Sendak's Wild Things who prevent the boy from eating his cereal, finishing his classwork, and getting to sleep at night. The twist at the end is sweet and clever, when his younger brother, who is suitably scared of monsters, comes looking for help. Neubecker matches Richards' direct and well-paced prose with humorously detailed and expressive pen-and-ink cartoons set ablaze with computerized colors. The format will make this easy to share with small groups, while the text invites early readers to gain independence. Add this to the shelf with Mayer's Little Monster picture books and Rebecca Emberly's There Was an Old Monster (2009).--Goldsmith, Francisca Copyright 2014 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Plenty of Halloween stories deal with fear, but debut author Richards suggests that bravery has its own pitfalls. His young hero isn't afraid of monsters, and, as a result, they won't leave him alone. "It's hard to climb out of bed in the morning," writes Richards, as the boy crawls out from under a heap of creatures that include a purple hairball, a blue octopuslike monster, and what looks like a giant yellow sponge with horns. The boy's monster "friends" are also happy to sample his cereal, munch on his homework, and wear his favorite pajamas. The book's ending fizzles a bit, with the boy simply foisting his troubles onto his younger brother, but Neubecker's pen-and-ink cartoons draw a good amount of fun out of the relationship between the put-upon narrator and the wide-eyed, well-meaning beasties. Ages 4-8. Author's agent: Paul Rodeen, Rodeen Literary Management. Illustrator's agent: Linda Pratt, Wernick & Pratt. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-Intrepid monster lovers will delight in reading again and again this list of irksome consequences of being friendly with these creatures. The watercolor and pen cartoons do not miss a mark: depictions of bulky, spiked, tentacled, polka-dotted, scaly, hairy, sharp-toothed, lurid-colored behemoth, and shrimp-sized monsters crush any moment of rest and spoil perfectly good cereal with a long red tongue, and the list goes on. Monsters won't leave this impatient child alone. He can't finish his homework, it gets misplaced, and his breakfast cereal tastes funny. Each complaint comes to life with subtle, amusing visual and typographical surprises. While the text says, "Snack takes forever to clean up," the illustration depicts a veritable food-hurling fandango. The nighttime flash-lit illustrations are superb, as are the dynamic layouts when, all of a sudden, something does scare the boy. His little brother shows up in shadow with his hair standing straight up. Will he get the monsters off his back? Recommended this one to mischievous types of all shapes and sizes, and pair it with Mo Willems's Leonardo, the Terrible Monster (Hyperion, 2005) to spark a discussion of unconventional points of view.-Sara Lissa Paulson, The American Sign Language and English Lower School, New York City (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.