Cover image for If It Rains Pancakes : Haiku and Lantern Poems
Title:
If It Rains Pancakes : Haiku and Lantern Poems
Author:
Cleary, Brian P., 1959-
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Poems. Selections
Publication Information:
Minneapolis : Millbrook Press, [2014]

©2014
Physical Description:
32 pages ; illustrations : 24 cm.
Summary:
Explains and demonstrates how to write two types of ancient Japanese poetry: haiku and lanterns.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Age: 7-11.
Program Information:
Reading Counts RC 3-5 3.1 3 Quiz: 63658.
ISBN:
9781467716093

9781467744126
Format :
Book

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PS3553.L39144 I35 2014 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3553.L39144 I35 2014 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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PS3553.L39144 I35 2014 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

What is a haiku? It sounds like a sneeze. And isn't a lantern a light source? Actually, they are two types of ancient Japanese poetry. Award-winning author Brian P. Cleary explains how each form works--and shows how these little poems can contain big surprises!

If It Rains Pancakes is packed with poems to make you chuckle, puzzle, and ponder. And when you've finished reading, you can try your hand at writing your own haiku and lanterns!


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Cleary introduces readers to haiku and lantern poems, defining each, providing background, explaining syllabic line requirements, and offering examples. Admitting that he takes a broad approach to haiku (traditionally they are nature poems), Cleary offers many humorous verses, including: My pet pig, Betty, / in her full karate stance, / performs the pork chop.' The lantern poems range from pastoral (Spring. / Yellows, / Blues, and greens. / Chirp, peck, peep, pop, / bloom) to more contemporary themes (Slush / gulping / icy treat. / Getting brain freeze. / Whoa). Rowland's colorful cartoon illustrations capture the varying moods and often extend the text. For example, he depicts one lantern poem (Eight: / circles / up and down. / Each must be worth / four) as a figure eight-shaped race track with four cars driving on each circle. Appended with suggested websites and books for further reading, this will be welcomed by classrooms studying poetry. Pair with Bob Raczka's Guyku: A Year of Haiku for Boys (2010).--Weisman, Kay Copyright 2014 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4-This slim volume introduces two forms of Japanese poetry. The first and larger section focuses on the more familiar haiku. A simple introduction defines the form but explains that while haiku subjects traditionally focus on nature, these selections cover a broader range of topics, including school and food. Twenty original haiku follow, illustrated with spot cartoon illustrations. The second part is dedicated to lantern poems (or a poem whose visual shape resembles a lantern), opening with an even briefer introduction and 15 illustrated examples. The poetry in both sections varies from thoughtful to silly. While this is an interesting look at the two different poetic forms, format is all that ties the wide assortment of selections together, and even the transition between the two sections feels abrupt. Still, the explanatory texts provide clear instruction and encouragement for readers creating their own poems.-Julie Roach, Cambridge Public Library, MA (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.