Cover image for Under the freedom tree
Title:
Under the freedom tree
Author:
VanHecke, Susan, author.
Publication Information:
Holland, Ohio : Dreamscape Media, [2014]

©2014
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (9 min.) : DVD video, sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
One night in 1861, three escaped slaves made their way from the Confederate line to a Union-held fort. The runaways were declared "contraband of war" and granted protection. As word spread, thousands of runaway slaves poured into the fort, seeking their freedom. These "contrabands" made a home for themselves, building the first African American community in the country. In 1863, they bore witness to one of the first readings of the Emancipation Proclamation in the South, beneath the sheltering branches of the tree now known as Emancipation Oak.
General Note:
Includes: About the Freedom tree.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Ages 5-9.
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9781629235790
Format :
DVD

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DVD 66849 Juvenile DVD Popular Materials-Juvenile Video
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DVD 66849 Juvenile DVD Family Viewing
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DVD 66849 Juvenile DVD Audio Visual
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DVD 66849 Juvenile DVD Audio Visual
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DVD 66849 Juvenile DVD Audio Visual
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On Order

Summary

Summary

One night in 1861, three escaped slaves made their way from the Confederate line to a Union-held fort. The runaways were declared ""contraband of war"" and granted protection. As word spread, thousands of runaway slaves poured into the fort, seeking their freedom. These ""contrabands"" made a home for themselves, building the first African American community in the country. In 1863, they bore witness to one of the first readings of the Emancipation Proclamation in the South - beneath the sheltering branches of the tree now known as Emancipation Oak.


Summary

Passion, intrigue, and murder make a deadly prescription...--One night in 1861, three escaped slaves made their way from the Confederacy to a Union fort and were granted protection. As word spread, thousands of slaves came to the fort, seeking freedom, where they built the first African-American community in the country. In 1863, they witnessed one of the first readings of the Emancipation Proclamation in the South, beneath the branches of the tree now known as Emancipation Oak.


Author Notes

Susan VanHecke lives twelve miles from the Emancipation Oak. For years she drove past the tree without even knowing it was there. When she learned of the tree's incredible history, she knew she wanted to share the story with children. Susan is the author of Raggin' Jazzin' Rockin': A History of American Musical Instrument Makers; Rock 'n' Roll Soldier; and An Apple Pie for Dinner. She makes her home in Norfolk, Virginia.

ILLUSTRATOR BIO
London Ladd is the illustrator of Oprah: The Little Speaker, by Carole Boston Weatherford; and March On! The Day My Brother Martin Changed the World, by Christine King Farris. He lives in Syracuse, New York.

READER BIO
JD Jackson is currently an Adjunct Professor at Los Angeles Southwest College. He has an MFA in Theater from Temple University and several TV and movie credits to his name including roles on House MD, ER, Law & Order, Third Watch, and Lucky Number Slevin.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

In staccato verse, VanHecke (Raggin' Jazzin' Rockin') illuminates an absorbing slice of Civil War history: runaway slaves' establishment of a settlement in newly seceded Virginia. In 1861, three slaves-Frank Baker, James Townsend, and Shepard Mallory-escape by boat from a Confederate camp, "Away/ from Southern soldiers/ who would/ own them,/ work them,/ beat them,/ sell them,/ keep them slaves forever." The three men land at a Union camp whose commander declares them "contraband of war" and refuses to return them to the Confederates. They and hundreds of other runaways who subsequently arrive in "Slabtown" work for the Union army and build two camps. Missionaries educate the children under the branches of the tree now known as the Emancipation Oak, where, in the story's triumphant finish, a boy reads the Emancipation Proclamation. Ladd's (Oprah: The Little Speaker) evocative and subtly textured acrylic, pastel, and colored pencil art reflects the evolving tenor of the story as uncertainty gives way to hope. An extensive author's note delves deeper into this immersive true story of courage and grit. Ages 6-9. Illustrator's agent: Lori Nowicki, Painted Words. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-4-The Freedom Tree or, as it is now known, Emancipation Oak, is a sprawling oak tree situated on the site of Fort Monroe in Hampton, Virginia, which was a popular spot for escaped slaves seeking asylum during the Civil War. In what is described as "Rebels Rubble," the inhabitants build the "Grand Contraband Camp," where their lives can begin again "sheltered in the shade of the old oak tree." The impassioned words are touching and do justice to the subject matter. The brief work is followed by a short overview of the historical context and events covered in the narrative. Myra Lucretia Taylor does a wonderful job with her delivery of this emotionally compelling account, told in free verse, of three men's escape from slavery. Highly recommended.-Brian Odom, Huntsville, AL (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

May moon gleams bright as Colonel's buttons. Three slip out unseen. Frank, James, Shepard scramble down the sandy bank, hearts drumming, eyes darting, knees trembling. Weathered skiff bobs in rustling rushes. Quick now, and quiet! Stars hold their breath and so do the three, four miles from the old oak tree. Oars dip, no sound, silver ripples. Steal away now, away. Excerpted from Under the Freedom Tree by Susan VanHecke All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.