Cover image for My life as a foreign country
Title:
My life as a foreign country
Author:
Turner, Brian, 1967-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First American edition.
Publication Information:
New York : W.W. Norton & Company, 2014.
Physical Description:
x, 212 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
"In this ... memoir, award-winning poet Brian Turner retraces his war experience--pre-deployment to combat zone, homecoming to aftermath. Free of self-indulgence or self-glorification, his account combines recollection with the imagination's efforts to make reality comprehensible. Across time, he seeks parallels in the histories of others who have gone to war, especially his taciturn grandfather (World War II), father (Cold War), and uncle (Vietnam). Turner also offers something that is truly rare in a memoir of violent conflict--he sees through the eyes of the enemy, imagining his way into the experience of the 'other'"--Provided by publisher.
General Note:
"A memoir"--Jacket.

Also published: London : Jonathan Cape, 2014.
Language:
English
Personal Subject:
ISBN:
9780393245011
Format :
Book

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DS79.766.T87 A3 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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DS79.766.T87 A3 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Biography
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DS79.766.T87 A3 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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DS79.766.T87 A3 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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DS79.766.T87 A3 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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DS79.766.T87 A3 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Biography
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DS79.766.T87 A3 2014 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

A war memoir of unusual literary beauty and power fromthe acclaimed poet who wrote the poem "The Hurt Locker."

In 2003, Sergeant Brian Turner crossed the line of departure with a convoy of soldiers headed into the Iraqi desert.

Now he lies awake each night beside his sleeping wife, imagining himself as a drone aircraft, hovering over the terrains of Bosnia and Vietnam, Iraq and Northern Ireland, the killing fields of Cambodia and the death camps of Europe.

In this breathtaking memoir, award-winning poet Brian Turner retraces his war experience--pre-deployment to combat zone, homecoming to aftermath. Free of self-indulgence or self-glorification, his account combines recollection with the imagination's efforts to make reality comprehensible. Across time, he seeks parallels in the histories of others who have gone to war, especially his taciturn grandfather (World War II), father (Cold War), and uncle (Vietnam). Turner also offers something that is truly rare in a memoir of violent conflict--he sees through the eyes of the enemy, imagining his way into the experience of the "other." Through it all, he paints a devastating portrait of what it means to be a soldier and a human being.


Author Notes

Brian Turner was born in Visalia, California on February 12, 1967. He received an MFA from the University of Oregon before serving for seven years in the U.S. Army. He was deployed to Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1999-2000, then in November 2003, he was an infantry team leader for a year in Iraq. His first book, Here, Bullet, chronicles his time in Iraq. His other books include Phantom Noise and My Life as a Foreign Country.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Booklist Review

Following his yearlong tour in Iraq, former U.S. Army infantry sergeant Turner penned his acclaimed poetry collection, Here, Bullet (2005), which chronicled his wartime experiences with elegance and compassion. In more than a hundred vignettes, his memoir applies the same impressionistic quality to the broader sense of war, exploring the generations of relatives before him who served in WWII, Vietnam, and the Cold War and questioning why he joined the military. Now out of the service and married, Turner reflects on soldiers' powerlessness and fears, the lingering aftereffects of global violence, and his own uncertainties about warfare, all loosely told from the perspective of a drone unbound by place and time. In restrained but resonant detail, he recalls making war movies with his childhood friends, imagines the delicate process of constructing terrorist bombs, pictures his grandfather killing a Japanese soldier, and reflects on American troops invading Iraqi homes. Turner's deeply felt snapshots offer empathic glimpses into the hearts of those involved in battle and culminate in a larger, lyrical depiction of human depravity.--Fullmer, Jonathan Copyright 2014 Booklist