Cover image for It wasn't me
Title:
It wasn't me
Author:
Jeffers, Oliver, author, illustrator.
Publication Information:
New York, NY : Philomel Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) Inc., 2014.
Physical Description:
1 volume (various pagings) : color illustrations ; 28 cm.
Summary:
"Hueys may look the same, think the same, and even do the same things, but that doesn't mean they can't disagree. The only problem is, they can't seem to agree on what they didn't agree on in the first place! Which ultimately leads to an even bigger disagreement"--
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780399257681
Format :
Book

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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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J PIC BOOK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

What's all the arguing about? There are plenty of Hueys to go around in this hilarious story from the #1 bestselling illustrator of The Day the Crayons Quit !

The Hueys are back! Oliver Jeffers' jelly bean-shaped creatures may look the same, think the same, and even do the same things, but that doesn't mean they always agree. The only problem is, they can't seem to agree on what they disagreed on in the first place! Which ultimately leads to an even bigger disagreement! Confused? Well, so are the Hueys. Which only adds to the fun and hilarity.

Anyone who has ever had to referee an argument among siblings or friends will appreciate the absurdity Oliver Jeffers reveals in the every-day trials of getting along.

Oliver Jeffers is the New York Times bestselling author/illustrator of Stuck , The Incredible Book-Eating Boy , This Moose Belongs to Me , Lost and Found , How to Catch a Star , The Heart in the Bottle (which is also a highly-acclaimed iPad app narrated by Helena Bonham Carter) and many more. He is also the ilustrator of the mega-selling The Day the Crayons Quit , written by Drew Daywalt. His books have won numerous awards, including the Nestlé Children's Book Prize Gold Award, the Blue Peter Book of the Year, and the Irish Book Awards Children's Book of the Year.


Author Notes

Oliver Jeffers was born in Port Hedland, Western Australia in 1977. He grew up in Belfast, Northern Ireland. He received a First Class Honors Degree in illustration and visual communication and certificate of foundation studies from the University of Ulster, School of Art and Design in 2001. His work has been exhibited in multiple cities, including the National Portrait Gallery in London, the Brooklyn Museum, and Gestalten Space in Berlin.

He writes and illustrates picture books. His debut book, How to Catch a Star, was published in 2004 and won a Merit Award at the CBI/Bisto Book of Year Awards. His second book, Lost and Found, won the Gold Award at Nestle Children's Book Prize and was developed into an animated short film, which has received over sixty awards including a BAFTA for Best Animated Short Film. His other books include The Incredible Book Eating Boy, The Great Paper Caper, Up and Down, Stuck, This Moose Belongs to Me, Once upon an Alphabet: Short Stories for All Letters, The Hueys series and A Child of Books. He has won numerous awards including the Smarties Award, Irish Book of the Year, The Blue Peter Book of the Year, and the 2017 Academy of British Cover Design Award in the Children's category.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

The Hueys (first introduced in The Hueys in the New Sweater, 2012) are back in a bigger format and with a new quandary. The opening endpapers show our round, resolute friends having a conversation about how to address a pesky fly (the conversation, in typical Jeffers fashion, happens in pictures, not words). The story continues with five differently colored Hueys enthusing about all manner of flying objects, but soon, out of nowhere, discord arrives and an argument ensues. Just when things are at their most out of control, Gillespie Huey asks what everyone is fighting about. No one knows, so they decide to go look at a dead fly, content and collegial once more. Jeffers is a master of this sort of wry humor, with his deeply expressive gestures; generous, empty backgrounds; and quirky charm. The explosion of the argument and stillness of the solution resonates on just the right frequency, distilling complex emotion into something manageable and entertaining. Kids will recognize themselves here, over and over again.--Barthelmess, Thom Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Jeffers's first book about the Hueys quietly extolled the virtues of nonconformity; with equal subtlety (and a touch of dark humor) he explores disagreement in this sequel. "The thing about the Hueys," Jeffers writes of his egg-shaped, stick-legged crew, "was that most of the time they got along." But when they fight-Jeffers depicts their argument as a joint speech bubble filled with scribbles, scrawls, storm cloud, hammer, and skull-and-crossbones-it's up to a Huey named Gillespie to set things right. What's his trick? Distraction. "Want to see a dead fly?" he asks, and everyone does, naturally. A stylish and sophisticated story that reminds readers that some fights aren't worth having. Ages 3-5. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Familiar from their debut in The Hueys in the New Sweater (Philomel, 2012), the oval creatures with the stick appendages are back. Five excited Hueys are talking into a single speech bubble about a fly buzzing by. One of them has a flyswatter. They are then depicted conversing about other winged things: a bird, teacup, horse, and elephant. When the bubble turns stormy, Gillespie (who appears to be the mature one) interrupts the group to discover the cause of their argument. The blame game goes on heatedly for several spreads, until he tries again. The page turns white with silence; they are stumped. By the time their friend asks: "Want to see a dead fly?" everyone runs to look, distracted from their discord. The action takes place against solid, mostly white backgrounds, with the eye being drawn first to the graphically dynamic conversation bubbles. Children will undoubtedly enjoy the simple, but expressive, caricatures and the childlike pencil and mixed-media compositions. They will understand the author's humorous way of unveiling the silliness of certain conflicts. The silence at key junctures, including the scene with individual reactions to the dead fly, will give viewers pause, too. Parents may get new ideas for conflict management under Gillespie's cool tutelage. A worthy sequel.-Wendy Lukehart, District of Columbia Public Library (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.