Cover image for Cronkite's war : his World War II letters home
Title:
Cronkite's war : his World War II letters home
Author:
Cronkite, Walter, IV.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Washington, D.C. : National Geographic Society, c2013.
Physical Description:
xxxiv, 318 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Summary:
A giant in American journalism in the vanguard of "The Greatest Generation" reveals his World War II experiences in this National Geographic book.
Language:
English
Contents:
Foreword by Tom Brokaw -- Map : Walter Cronkite's World War II assignments -- Character key -- Introduction by Walter Cronkite IV -- A pretty personal matter -- The writing Sixty-Ninth -- The youthful dean of American air-war writers -- Invasion jitters -- Once this war is over -- Epilogue by Maurice Isserman -- Afterword by Walter Cronkite IV -- Time line.
ISBN:
9781426210198
Format :
Book

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D799.U6 C76 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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D799.U6 C76 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Popular Materials-Biography
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D799.U6 C76 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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D799.U6 C76 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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D799.U6 C76 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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D799.U6 C76 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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D799.U6 C76 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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D799.U6 C76 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

"A giant in American journalism in the vanguard of "The Greatest Generation" reveals his World War II experiences in this National Geographic book. Walter Cronkite, an obscure 23-year-old United Press wire service reporter, married Betsy Maxwell on March 30, 1940, following a four-year courtship. She proved to be the love of his life, and their marriage lasted happily until her death in 2005. But before Walter and Betsy Cronkite celebrated their second anniversary, he became a credentialed war correspondent, preparing to leave her behind to go overseas. The couple spent months apart in the summer and fall of 1942, as Cronkite sailed on convoys to England and North Africa across the submarine-infested waters of the North Atlantic. After a brief December leave in New York City spent with his young wife, Cronkite left again on assignment for England. This time, the two would not be reunited until the end of the war in Europe. Cronkite would console himself during their absence by writing her long, detailed letters -- sometimes five in a week -- describing his experiences as a war correspondent, his observations of life in wartime Europe, and his longing for her. etsy Cro


Author Notes

Walter Cronkite was born in St. Louis, Missouri on November 4, 1916. As a teenager, he got a job with The Houston Post as a copy boy and cub reporter. In college, he worked part-time for the Houston Press, a paper he joined full-time after leaving the University of Texas in 1935. From 1940 to 1949, he reported for the United Press wire service. One of the first journalists accredited to cover World War II, Cronkite accompanied Allied forces into North Africa, reported on the Normandy invasion and the Battle of the Bulge. At the end of the war, he became UP's bureau chief in Moscow and then its chief correspondent at the Nuremburg war crimes trials.

After returning to the United States in 1948, he covered Washington, D.C., for a group of radio stations before joining CBS, where he remained for the rest of his career, first working on various news programs and then, in 1962, becoming anchor of the CBS Evening News. Over the years, Cronkite covered such events as the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the moon landing of Apollo II (staying on the air 24 hours to do so), the Vietnam War, and the Watergate scandal. He twice visited Vietnam during the war, and, after the Tet offensive in 1968, candidly questioned the rationale for American involvement and the U.S. military's prospects for victory. He won numerous awards including several Emmy Awards, the Peabody Award in 1962, the William A. White Journalism Award in 1969, the George Polk Award in 1971, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1981.

After his retirement in 1981, Cronkite continued to work on special projects for CBS and wrote his autobiography A Reporter's Life in 1996. He died from was complications of dementia on July 17, 2009 at the age of 92.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Compiled by the grandson of the late CBS Evening News anchorman, this is a fascinating and informative collection of Walter Cronkite Jr.'s personal World War II letters to his wife, Betsy. The correspondence offers a chronological account of Cronkite's experiences and impressions as a young war reporter based out of London and then Brussels. Along with Hamilton College history professor Isserman (Fallen Giants: A History of Himalayan Mountaineering From the Age of Empire to the Age of Extremes, coauthor), the fourth Cronkite interweaves contextual commentary with the letters to create a seamless narrative of his grandfather's thrilling adventures, including bombing missions over Germany, rocket attacks on London, an air assault by glider into Holland, and following Patton's army into the Battle of the Bulge. By war's end, Cronkite's reportage had made him one of the preeminent American journalists of his generation and set the stage for his future success as one of the most beloved anchors of the nightly news' heyday. A thoroughly enjoyable read, this will enthrall fans of the newsman, as well as students of WWII and the history of journalism. 25 b&w photos. Agent: Sandra Dijkstra, Sandra Dijkstra Literary Agency. (May 7) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

Before Walter Cronkite (1916-2009) became a famous CBS television newsman, he reported on World War II from London for the United Press newswire service when he was still in his twenties. Here Cronkite's grandson (associate producer, CBS News) and Isserman (history, Hamilton Coll.) present a selection of his letters at that time to his wife, Betsy, in Kansas City, MO-they'd married in 1940-along with helpful explanations and historical context. These unpretentious letters, which barely mention any dangers the journalist faced, are mostly from England in the period 1943-45. They detail the daily routines of a journalist in wartime: arranging meetings, writing stories under deadline, dealing with military censors, struggling to travel anywhere, shortages and rationing of everything, and enjoying rarities like chocolate and razor blades. He also describes the legendary social environment of wartime London. Like any true reporter, Cronkite wanted to cover the big stories-D-day, bombing missions, ground combat-but, other than on a trip to northern Europe, he was obliged to remain in London (he'd been to North Africa before these letters start). VERDICT With its fascinating glimpses of a stirring time that was a crucible for so many journalists, this book is for all general readers interested in Cronkite, World War II war correspondents, or wartime London.-Daniel Blewett, Coll. of DuPage Lib., Glen Ellyn, IL (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Tom BrokawWalter Cronkite IVMaurice IssermanWalter Cronkite IV
Author's Notep. ix
Forewordp. xi
Map: Walter Cronkite's World War II Assignmentsp. xiv
Character Keyp. xvii
Introductionp. xxv
Chapter 1 A Pretty Personal Matterp. 1
Chapter 2 The Writing Sixty-Ninthp. 11
Chapter 3 The Youthful Dean of American Air-War Writersp. 79
Chapter 4 Invasion Jittersp. 143
Chapter 5 Once This War Is Overp. 201
Epiloguep. 289
Afterwordp. 303
Time Linep. 309
Acknowledgmentsp. 311
Select Bibliographyp. 313
Illustrations Creditsp. 314
Indexp. 315