Cover image for The beat hotel
Title:
The beat hotel
Author:
Govenar, Alan B., 1952-
Publication Information:
[United States] : First Run Features, [2011]

©2011
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (82 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
1957, Paris. The Latin Quarter. A cheap no-name hotel becomes a haven for a new breed of artists struggling to free themselves from the conformity and censorship of America. Called the Beat Hotel, it soon became an epicenter of the Beat generation.
General Note:
Bonus materials include short films Harold Chapman on his photography and The dreamachine, plus Elliot Rudie drawings and deleted scene of William S. Burroughs and Ian Sommerville.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
Not rated.
UPC:
720229915182
Format :
DVD

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PS228.B6 B4 2011V Adult DVD Open Shelf
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PS228.B6 B4 2011V Adult DVD Audio Visual
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Summary

Summary

Pay a visit to the French hotel that nurtured the creativity of the Beat generation's most prolific writers in this documentary from filmmaker Alan Govenar. As Alan Ginsberg's landmark poem Howl was being put on trial for obscenity in the United States, American writers who valued creative expression began fleeing oversees. Those writers, including such luminaries as Peter Orlovsky and Gregory Corso, found refuge in a run down, rue Git le Coeur hotel that would soon become the epicenter of Beat culture. Presided over by the persevering Madame Rachou, the Paris boarding house dubbed the Beat Hotel would soon become home to William Burroughs, Brion Gysin, and Ian Somerville, among others. There, these maverick writers found the inspiration to challenge convention, and pen the poems, stories, and books that would set the literary world ablaze. As former tenants Jean-Jacques Lebel, George Whitman, and Cyclops Lester share their memories of life in the Beat Hotel, vintage photographs from photographer Harold Chapman and animated artwork by Elliot Rudie offer a vivid look at life in a community ungoverned by the rules of contemporary society. ~ Jason Buchanan, Rovi