Cover image for The drama years : real girls talk about surviving middle school -- bullies, brands, body image, and more
Title:
The drama years : real girls talk about surviving middle school -- bullies, brands, body image, and more
Author:
Kilpatrick, Haley.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Free Press, [2012]

©2012
Physical Description:
ix, 276 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
"An urgently needed and insightful guidebook for parents and teachers struggling to help girls navigate the often-difficult transition into adolescence by the founder of Girl Talk.It has never been easy to be a middle school girl. In the few short years between grade school and high school, girls go through an incredible number of physical and mental changes, making this the most formative--and precarious--time in their lives. Groups form and turn on each other; classmates whisper about who's saying what to whom; childhood friends tell trusted secrets; and just deciding where to sit in the lunchroom can be a daily struggle. Then there's the biological wave of changes--all the growth spurts, new curves, and new hormones--and suddenly, there are more grown-up things to worry about like dealing with guys and sexuality. All the while, they're constantly bombarded by contradictory and confusing messages from society and the media--not to mention the world of video chat, texting, Facebook, and Twitter. In 2002, when she was only fifteen, Haley Kilpatrick created Girl Talk, a nonprofit organization of more than 35,000 members dedicated to helping girls deal with these issues. The Drama Years is packed with the voices of tweens, who share their experiences, anecdotes, and advice on everything from stress to body image to getting along with parents. This is a survival guide written from the trenches, packed with real life examples and practical strategies, to help parents and daughters survive The Drama Years"--

"The Drama Years is the definitive guide to the pressures that middle school girls experience every day"--
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9781451627916
Format :
Book

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HQ798 .K514 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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HQ798 .K514 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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HQ798 .K514 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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HQ798 .K514 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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HQ798 .K514 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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HQ798 .K514 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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HQ798 .K514 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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HQ798 .K514 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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HQ798 .K514 2012 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

It has never been easy to be a middle school girl. Between the ages of 11 and 14, girls go through an incredible number of physical and mental changes, making this the most formative and precarious time in their lives. The Drama Years is packed with the voices of tweens who share their experiences, anecdotes and advice on everything from stress to body image to getting along with parents. This is a survival guide written from the trenches, packed with real life examples and practical strategies, to help parents and daughters survive The Drama Years.


Author Notes

Haley Kilpatrick has been named one of Glamour's "20 Young Women Changing the World Now," The Huffington Post's "Greatest Woman of the Day," Self magazine's "Women Doing Good," and People's "All-Star Among Us," among many other honors. She has been featured on NBC's Today show, NBC Nightly News, CNN, HLN, and ABC. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia.
Whitney Joiner, a journalist based in Marfa, Texas, is a former features editor at Seventeen. She writes about issues related to young girls and women for a variety of publications, including ELLE, Glamour, Marie Claire, the New York Times, Teen Vogue, and Whole Living.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Kilpatrick began Girl Talk, a nonprofit peer-to-peer mentoring program that pairs high school girls with middle school girls in 2002 when she was 15 years old. The program swiftly grew from her Georgia high school to 43 states, six countries, and 40,000 members. This book is an outgrowth of the program and is based upon interviews as well as on the challenges she faced during her own "tween" years (ages 11 through 13 or grades six through eight). Though the author points out that she is neither a psychologist nor an academic (and therefore has chosen to skirt more serious issues such as eating disorders and addiction), she does provide sound advice that will help parents to support their tween daughters. Each chapter examines a particular issue (i.e., self-esteem, materialism, body image, love and relationships), and then offers guidance via "Try This" boxes. Kilpatrick's overarching solution is to help the tween find an "anchor" activity (such as a sport or music), encourage her to give a helping hand (get her involved in volunteer work), and help her find an adoptive older sister (someone to talk to who's been through similar experiences). With this practical guide to navigating the tumultuous tweens, Kilpatrick hopes to help downplay the drama, generate kindness, and break the "mean girl cycle" so prevalent in contemporary middle school culture. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

The deplorable behavior of "mean girls" during adolescence is hardly new, and most of us may recall who these people were, whom they iced, and what they did. Having experienced epic hurts herself, at a mere 15 years old, author Kilpatrick founded Girl Talk, a nonprofit organization now 35,000 members strong that is dedicated to helping young girls survive the stress of their middle school years. In chapters addressing such topics as stress, materialism, competition, frenemies, etc., the author includes poignant interview excerpts and insights from middle schoolers ("I turned inward in order to stay under the radar-to not shine because I didn't want to give other girls more reason to talk about me"), tips for parents, reflections from older girls looking back, and bullet lists of final considerations. VERDICT Girl Talk is a commendable peer mentorship program, and Kilpatrick's empathetic encouragement is palpable. In addition to describing the benefits of finding a mentor, she also strongly encourages athletic and volunteer activities to help girls stay physically strong, diversify the friendship pool, and gain broader perspective. This title will help even the tragically deluded parent become a more comforting advocate. (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Introductionp. 1
1 Staying True to Her: Self-Esteem, Self-Awareness, and Self-Respectp. 15
2 I'm So Stressed!: Handling Everyday Anxietyp. 37
3 Who Has What: Name Brands, Materialism, and Competitionp. 61
4 Her Body, Herself: Body Image, Weight, and the Pressure to Be Prettyp. 89
5 BFF's, Frenemies, and Mean Girls: What It Means to Be a Friendp. 121
6 "It's Not Just Cooties Anymore": Love and Relationshipsp. 157
7 Dealing with You: Getting Along with Parentsp. 183
8 It's Not Fair!: Boundaries and Consequencesp. 209
9 Getting Serious: When the Drama Is Very Realp. 233
Afterwordp. 253
Sourcesp. 255
Resourcesp. 257
Acknowledgmentsp. 265
Indexp. 269